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Balance control and adaptation during vibratory perturbations in middle-aged and elderly humans.

Fransson, Per-Anders LU ; Kristinsdottir, E. K.; Hafström, Anna LU ; Magnusson, Måns LU and Johansson, Rolf LU (2004) In European Journal of Applied Physiology1999-01-01+01:00 91(5-6). p.595-603
Abstract
The objective was to investigate if healthy elderly people respond and adapt differently to postural disturbances compared to middle-aged people. Thirty middle-aged (mean age 37.8 years, range 24–56 years) and forty healthy elderly subjects (mean age 74.6 years, range 66–88 years) were tested with posturography. Body sway was evoked by applying pseudorandom vibratory stimulation to the belly of the gastrocnemius muscles of both legs simultaneously. The tests were performed both with eyes open and eyes closed. The anteroposterior body sway was measured with a force platform and analyzed with a method that considers the adaptive changes of posture and stimulation responses. The results showed that middle-aged people generally used a... (More)
The objective was to investigate if healthy elderly people respond and adapt differently to postural disturbances compared to middle-aged people. Thirty middle-aged (mean age 37.8 years, range 24–56 years) and forty healthy elderly subjects (mean age 74.6 years, range 66–88 years) were tested with posturography. Body sway was evoked by applying pseudorandom vibratory stimulation to the belly of the gastrocnemius muscles of both legs simultaneously. The tests were performed both with eyes open and eyes closed. The anteroposterior body sway was measured with a force platform and analyzed with a method that considers the adaptive changes of posture and stimulation responses. The results showed that middle-aged people generally used a different postural control strategy as compared to the elderly. The elderly responded more rapidly to vibratory perturbation, used more high-frequency (>0.1 Hz) motions and the motion dynamics had a higher degree of complexity. Moreover, the elderly had diminished ability to use visual information to improve balance control. Altogether, despite having an effective postural control adaptation similar to that of middle-aged people, the elderly had more difficultly in withstanding balance perturbations. These findings suggest that the balance control deterioration associated with aging cannot be fully compensated for by postural control adaptation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adaptation, Balance, Vision, Elderly
in
European Journal of Applied Physiology1999-01-01+01:00
volume
91
issue
5-6
pages
595 - 603
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000221452900013
  • pmid:14985989
  • scopus:2442621207
ISSN
1439-6327
DOI
10.1007/s00421-003-1013-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b28738eb-f3ec-4a08-ad6a-39e3e7e99ec3 (old id 121605)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=14985989&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-06-21 14:37:25
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:37:56
@article{b28738eb-f3ec-4a08-ad6a-39e3e7e99ec3,
  abstract     = {The objective was to investigate if healthy elderly people respond and adapt differently to postural disturbances compared to middle-aged people. Thirty middle-aged (mean age 37.8 years, range 24–56 years) and forty healthy elderly subjects (mean age 74.6 years, range 66–88 years) were tested with posturography. Body sway was evoked by applying pseudorandom vibratory stimulation to the belly of the gastrocnemius muscles of both legs simultaneously. The tests were performed both with eyes open and eyes closed. The anteroposterior body sway was measured with a force platform and analyzed with a method that considers the adaptive changes of posture and stimulation responses. The results showed that middle-aged people generally used a different postural control strategy as compared to the elderly. The elderly responded more rapidly to vibratory perturbation, used more high-frequency (>0.1 Hz) motions and the motion dynamics had a higher degree of complexity. Moreover, the elderly had diminished ability to use visual information to improve balance control. Altogether, despite having an effective postural control adaptation similar to that of middle-aged people, the elderly had more difficultly in withstanding balance perturbations. These findings suggest that the balance control deterioration associated with aging cannot be fully compensated for by postural control adaptation.},
  author       = {Fransson, Per-Anders and Kristinsdottir, E. K. and Hafström, Anna and Magnusson, Måns and Johansson, Rolf},
  issn         = {1439-6327},
  keyword      = {Adaptation,Balance,Vision,Elderly},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5-6},
  pages        = {595--603},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {European Journal of Applied Physiology1999-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Balance control and adaptation during vibratory perturbations in middle-aged and elderly humans.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-003-1013-1},
  volume       = {91},
  year         = {2004},
}