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Working ability in relation to disease severity, everyday occupations and well-being in women with limited systemic sclerosis.

Sandqvist, Gunnel LU ; Scheja, Agneta LU and Eklund, Mona LU (2008) In Rheumatology (Oxford, England) 47. p.1708-1711
Abstract
Objective. To investigate how women with SSc and varying degrees of working ability differed regarding disease severity, everyday occupations and well-being. Working ability was operationalized according to the degree of sick leave. Methods. Forty-four women of working age with lcSSc were assessed regarding sociodemographic characteristics, disease severity including organ manifestation, perceived physical symptoms, hand function, and satisfaction with everyday occupations, self-rated health and well-being. Results. The subjects formed three groups with regard to reduction in working capacity. Twenty-one women (48%) had no sick leave, 15 women (34%) were on partial sick leave and eight women (18%) were temporarily on full-time sick leave... (More)
Objective. To investigate how women with SSc and varying degrees of working ability differed regarding disease severity, everyday occupations and well-being. Working ability was operationalized according to the degree of sick leave. Methods. Forty-four women of working age with lcSSc were assessed regarding sociodemographic characteristics, disease severity including organ manifestation, perceived physical symptoms, hand function, and satisfaction with everyday occupations, self-rated health and well-being. Results. The subjects formed three groups with regard to reduction in working capacity. Twenty-one women (48%) had no sick leave, 15 women (34%) were on partial sick leave and eight women (18%) were temporarily on full-time sick leave or had a full disability pension. There were no statistically significant differences concerning sociodemographics between the groups. Women without sick leave had less physically demanding jobs (P = 0.026), and the hypothesis that working ability reflects lower disease severity was confirmed regarding dexterity grip force and perceived fatigue and breathlessness (P < 0.05). Greater working ability was associated with better capacity to perform activities of daily life (P < 0.01), greater satisfaction with occupations (P < 0.01), better well-being (P < 0.001) and better health (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Fifty per cent of the women were restricted in their working ability; the lower the working ability, the lower their perceived well-being. This emphasizes the need for further research into the factors that promote working ability and the development of suitable methods to improve working ability. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Rheumatology (Oxford, England)
volume
47
pages
1708 - 1711
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000260134100023
  • pmid:18815157
  • scopus:54449083043
ISSN
1462-0332
DOI
10.1093/rheumatology/ken359
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
928d0197-d75f-477a-9131-6992e6747275 (old id 1242655)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18815157?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-10-03 15:36:40
date last changed
2017-07-02 04:40:51
@article{928d0197-d75f-477a-9131-6992e6747275,
  abstract     = {Objective. To investigate how women with SSc and varying degrees of working ability differed regarding disease severity, everyday occupations and well-being. Working ability was operationalized according to the degree of sick leave. Methods. Forty-four women of working age with lcSSc were assessed regarding sociodemographic characteristics, disease severity including organ manifestation, perceived physical symptoms, hand function, and satisfaction with everyday occupations, self-rated health and well-being. Results. The subjects formed three groups with regard to reduction in working capacity. Twenty-one women (48%) had no sick leave, 15 women (34%) were on partial sick leave and eight women (18%) were temporarily on full-time sick leave or had a full disability pension. There were no statistically significant differences concerning sociodemographics between the groups. Women without sick leave had less physically demanding jobs (P = 0.026), and the hypothesis that working ability reflects lower disease severity was confirmed regarding dexterity grip force and perceived fatigue and breathlessness (P &lt; 0.05). Greater working ability was associated with better capacity to perform activities of daily life (P &lt; 0.01), greater satisfaction with occupations (P &lt; 0.01), better well-being (P &lt; 0.001) and better health (P &lt; 0.001). Conclusions. Fifty per cent of the women were restricted in their working ability; the lower the working ability, the lower their perceived well-being. This emphasizes the need for further research into the factors that promote working ability and the development of suitable methods to improve working ability.},
  author       = {Sandqvist, Gunnel and Scheja, Agneta and Eklund, Mona},
  issn         = {1462-0332},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1708--1711},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Rheumatology (Oxford, England)},
  title        = {Working ability in relation to disease severity, everyday occupations and well-being in women with limited systemic sclerosis.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/ken359},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2008},
}