Advanced

Liberal versus restricted fluid prescription in stabilised patients with chronic heart failure: Result of a randomised cross-over study of the effects on health-related quality of life, physical capacity, thirst and morbidity

Holst, Marie; Stromberg, Anna; Lindholm, Maud and Willenheimer, Ronnie LU (2008) In Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal 42(5). p.316-322
Abstract
Objective. To compare the effects of a restrictive versus a liberal fluid prescription, on quality of life, physical capacity, thirst and hospital admissions, in patients who had improved from NYHA class (III-)IV CHF to a stable condition without clinical signs of significant fluid overload. Design. The present study is a randomised cross-over study. Seventy-four patients (mean age 70 +/- 10 years, 16% women) - with mild-moderate CHF - were randomised 1:1 to either of two 16-week interventions. Intervention 1 prescribed a maximum fluid intake of 1.5 L/day. Intervention 2 prescribed a maximum fluid intake of 30-35 ml/kg body weight/day. Sixty-five patients completed the study. Results. There were no significant between-intervention... (More)
Objective. To compare the effects of a restrictive versus a liberal fluid prescription, on quality of life, physical capacity, thirst and hospital admissions, in patients who had improved from NYHA class (III-)IV CHF to a stable condition without clinical signs of significant fluid overload. Design. The present study is a randomised cross-over study. Seventy-four patients (mean age 70 +/- 10 years, 16% women) - with mild-moderate CHF - were randomised 1:1 to either of two 16-week interventions. Intervention 1 prescribed a maximum fluid intake of 1.5 L/day. Intervention 2 prescribed a maximum fluid intake of 30-35 ml/kg body weight/day. Sixty-five patients completed the study. Results. There were no significant between-intervention differences in end-of-intervention quality of life, physical capacity or hospitalisation. However, there was a significant favourable effect on thirst and less difficulties to adhere to the fluid prescription during the liberal fluid prescription intervention. Conclusion. The results from this study indicate that it may be beneficial and safe to recommend a liberal fluid prescription, based on body weight, in stabilised CHF patients. These results warrant further investigation of the effects of fluid advice in CHF. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
chronic heart failure, thirst, fluid prescription
in
Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal
volume
42
issue
5
pages
316 - 322
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000259318400005
  • scopus:55449110645
ISSN
1651-2006
DOI
10.1080/14017430802071200
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
12a8bc0d-7679-492a-bd2c-5252059ef044 (old id 1246057)
date added to LUP
2008-11-19 11:33:01
date last changed
2017-05-28 03:58:03
@article{12a8bc0d-7679-492a-bd2c-5252059ef044,
  abstract     = {Objective. To compare the effects of a restrictive versus a liberal fluid prescription, on quality of life, physical capacity, thirst and hospital admissions, in patients who had improved from NYHA class (III-)IV CHF to a stable condition without clinical signs of significant fluid overload. Design. The present study is a randomised cross-over study. Seventy-four patients (mean age 70 +/- 10 years, 16% women) - with mild-moderate CHF - were randomised 1:1 to either of two 16-week interventions. Intervention 1 prescribed a maximum fluid intake of 1.5 L/day. Intervention 2 prescribed a maximum fluid intake of 30-35 ml/kg body weight/day. Sixty-five patients completed the study. Results. There were no significant between-intervention differences in end-of-intervention quality of life, physical capacity or hospitalisation. However, there was a significant favourable effect on thirst and less difficulties to adhere to the fluid prescription during the liberal fluid prescription intervention. Conclusion. The results from this study indicate that it may be beneficial and safe to recommend a liberal fluid prescription, based on body weight, in stabilised CHF patients. These results warrant further investigation of the effects of fluid advice in CHF.},
  author       = {Holst, Marie and Stromberg, Anna and Lindholm, Maud and Willenheimer, Ronnie},
  issn         = {1651-2006},
  keyword      = {chronic heart failure,thirst,fluid prescription},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {316--322},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal},
  title        = {Liberal versus restricted fluid prescription in stabilised patients with chronic heart failure: Result of a randomised cross-over study of the effects on health-related quality of life, physical capacity, thirst and morbidity},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14017430802071200},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2008},
}