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Hunting reduces recruitment of primate-dispersed trees in Amazonian Peru

Nunez-Iturri, Gabriela; Olsson, Ola LU and Howe, Henry F. (2008) In Biological Conservation 141(6). p.1536-1546
Abstract
Hunting with firearms decimates primates of large and medium body size (> 2 kg) that disperse the seeds of large-seeded trees. In continuous, un-fragmented forests of southeastern Peru regularly hunted with firearms for 30-40 years, large primates are extirpated and medium-sized (medium) primates are reduced 61% compared with protected forests. At hunted sites seedlings and small juveniles (< 1 m height) of trees dispersed by primates heavier than 2 kg are reduced 46%, a loss of one species m(-2), and abiotically-dispersed plants are 284% more common, adding eight individuals m(-2), compared with protected forests. Here we provide evidence consistent with the long-held prediction that commercial hunting changes plant communities. We... (More)
Hunting with firearms decimates primates of large and medium body size (> 2 kg) that disperse the seeds of large-seeded trees. In continuous, un-fragmented forests of southeastern Peru regularly hunted with firearms for 30-40 years, large primates are extirpated and medium-sized (medium) primates are reduced 61% compared with protected forests. At hunted sites seedlings and small juveniles (< 1 m height) of trees dispersed by primates heavier than 2 kg are reduced 46%, a loss of one species m(-2), and abiotically-dispersed plants are 284% more common, adding eight individuals m(-2), compared with protected forests. Here we provide evidence consistent with the long-held prediction that commercial hunting changes plant communities. We show that the composition of seedling and small juvenile tree communities that ultimately regenerate future forests differs markedly in forests hunted with firearms compared with protected forests. This opens the possibility of shifts in tree species composition, even in hunted forests that are not logged or fragmented, towards forests dominated by trees dispersed by wind or non-game animals. (c) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
primates, seed dispersal, tropical rain forest, seedling communities, Amazon basin, hunting
in
Biological Conservation
volume
141
issue
6
pages
1536 - 1546
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000257536100009
  • scopus:44649189753
ISSN
1873-2917
DOI
10.1016/j.biocon.2008.03.020
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e51924d8-87a2-454a-9c0f-fb174817440e (old id 1255158)
date added to LUP
2008-10-17 13:48:17
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:20:39
@article{e51924d8-87a2-454a-9c0f-fb174817440e,
  abstract     = {Hunting with firearms decimates primates of large and medium body size (&gt; 2 kg) that disperse the seeds of large-seeded trees. In continuous, un-fragmented forests of southeastern Peru regularly hunted with firearms for 30-40 years, large primates are extirpated and medium-sized (medium) primates are reduced 61% compared with protected forests. At hunted sites seedlings and small juveniles (&lt; 1 m height) of trees dispersed by primates heavier than 2 kg are reduced 46%, a loss of one species m(-2), and abiotically-dispersed plants are 284% more common, adding eight individuals m(-2), compared with protected forests. Here we provide evidence consistent with the long-held prediction that commercial hunting changes plant communities. We show that the composition of seedling and small juvenile tree communities that ultimately regenerate future forests differs markedly in forests hunted with firearms compared with protected forests. This opens the possibility of shifts in tree species composition, even in hunted forests that are not logged or fragmented, towards forests dominated by trees dispersed by wind or non-game animals. (c) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Nunez-Iturri, Gabriela and Olsson, Ola and Howe, Henry F.},
  issn         = {1873-2917},
  keyword      = {primates,seed dispersal,tropical rain forest,seedling communities,Amazon basin,hunting},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1536--1546},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Biological Conservation},
  title        = {Hunting reduces recruitment of primate-dispersed trees in Amazonian Peru},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2008.03.020},
  volume       = {141},
  year         = {2008},
}