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Incidence of Stroke and Stroke Subtypes in Malmo, Sweden, 1990-2000. Marked Differences Between Groups Defined by Birth Country.

Khan, Farhad LU ; Zia, Elisabet LU ; Janzon, Lars LU and Engström, Gunnar LU (2004) In Stroke: a journal of cerebral circulation 35(9). p.2054-2058
Abstract
Background and Purpose-The proportion of immigrants has increased in Sweden markedly during the last decades, as in many other Western countries. Incidence of stroke has increased during this period. However, it is primarily unknown whether incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes in Sweden is related to country of birth. Methods-Incidence of first-ever stroke was followed during 10 years in a cohort consisting of all 40- to 89-year-old inhabitants in the city of Malmo, Sweden (n=118134). Immigrants from 12 different countries were compared with native-born Swedes. Results-Adjusted for age, sex, marital status, and socioeconomic indicators, the incidence of stroke ( all subtypes) was significantly higher among immigrants from former... (More)
Background and Purpose-The proportion of immigrants has increased in Sweden markedly during the last decades, as in many other Western countries. Incidence of stroke has increased during this period. However, it is primarily unknown whether incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes in Sweden is related to country of birth. Methods-Incidence of first-ever stroke was followed during 10 years in a cohort consisting of all 40- to 89-year-old inhabitants in the city of Malmo, Sweden (n=118134). Immigrants from 12 different countries were compared with native-born Swedes. Results-Adjusted for age, sex, marital status, and socioeconomic indicators, the incidence of stroke ( all subtypes) was significantly higher among immigrants from former Yugoslavia (relative risk [RR], 1.31; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.6) and Hungary (RR, 1.33; CI, 1.02 to 1.7). A significantly increased incidence of intracerebral hemorrhage was observed in immigrants from Peoples Republic of China or Vietnam (RR, 4.2; CI, 1.7 to 10.4) and the former Soviet Union ( RR, 2.7; CI, 1.01 to 7.3). Immigrants from Finland had a significantly higher incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (RR, 2.8; CI, 1.1 to 6.8). A significantly lower incidence of stroke was observed in the group from Romania (RR, 0.14; CI, 0.04 to 0.6). Immigrants from Denmark, Norway, Germany, Chile, Czechoslovakia, and Poland had approximately the same risk as citizens born in Sweden. Conclusions-In this urban population from Sweden, there are substantial differences in stroke incidence and stroke subtypes between immigrants from different countries. To what extent this could be accounted for by exposure to biological risk factors remains to be explored. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
stroke, incidence, epidemiology, ethnic groups
in
Stroke: a journal of cerebral circulation
volume
35
issue
9
pages
2054 - 2058
publisher
American Heart Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000223537000011
  • pmid:15232121
  • scopus:4344683546
ISSN
1524-4628
DOI
10.1161/01.STR.0000135761.18954.0b
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ecc710e1-baf1-4462-9ff5-8cfbd73824b3 (old id 126033)
date added to LUP
2007-07-24 15:28:27
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:45:22
@article{ecc710e1-baf1-4462-9ff5-8cfbd73824b3,
  abstract     = {Background and Purpose-The proportion of immigrants has increased in Sweden markedly during the last decades, as in many other Western countries. Incidence of stroke has increased during this period. However, it is primarily unknown whether incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes in Sweden is related to country of birth. Methods-Incidence of first-ever stroke was followed during 10 years in a cohort consisting of all 40- to 89-year-old inhabitants in the city of Malmo, Sweden (n=118134). Immigrants from 12 different countries were compared with native-born Swedes. Results-Adjusted for age, sex, marital status, and socioeconomic indicators, the incidence of stroke ( all subtypes) was significantly higher among immigrants from former Yugoslavia (relative risk [RR], 1.31; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.6) and Hungary (RR, 1.33; CI, 1.02 to 1.7). A significantly increased incidence of intracerebral hemorrhage was observed in immigrants from Peoples Republic of China or Vietnam (RR, 4.2; CI, 1.7 to 10.4) and the former Soviet Union ( RR, 2.7; CI, 1.01 to 7.3). Immigrants from Finland had a significantly higher incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (RR, 2.8; CI, 1.1 to 6.8). A significantly lower incidence of stroke was observed in the group from Romania (RR, 0.14; CI, 0.04 to 0.6). Immigrants from Denmark, Norway, Germany, Chile, Czechoslovakia, and Poland had approximately the same risk as citizens born in Sweden. Conclusions-In this urban population from Sweden, there are substantial differences in stroke incidence and stroke subtypes between immigrants from different countries. To what extent this could be accounted for by exposure to biological risk factors remains to be explored.},
  author       = {Khan, Farhad and Zia, Elisabet and Janzon, Lars and Engström, Gunnar},
  issn         = {1524-4628},
  keyword      = {stroke,incidence,epidemiology,ethnic groups},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {2054--2058},
  publisher    = {American Heart Association},
  series       = { Stroke: a journal of cerebral circulation},
  title        = {Incidence of Stroke and Stroke Subtypes in Malmo, Sweden, 1990-2000. Marked Differences Between Groups Defined by Birth Country.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.STR.0000135761.18954.0b},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {2004},
}