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Social capital, the miniaturization of community and cannabis smoking among young adults.

Lindström, Martin LU (2004) In European Journal of Public Health 14(2). p.204-208
Abstract
Objectives: The impact of social participation, trust and the miniaturization of community, i.e. the combination of high social participation and low trust, on cannabis smoking was investigated.

Methods: The 2000 public health survey in Scania is a cross-sectional study. A total of 13,715 persons aged 18–80 years, of which 3,978 persons aged 18–34 years were included in this study, answered a postal questionnaire, which represents 59% of the random sample. A logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between the social capital variables and ever having experienced cannabis smoking. The multivariate analysis was performed to investigate the importance of possible confounders (age, country of origin and... (More)
Objectives: The impact of social participation, trust and the miniaturization of community, i.e. the combination of high social participation and low trust, on cannabis smoking was investigated.

Methods: The 2000 public health survey in Scania is a cross-sectional study. A total of 13,715 persons aged 18–80 years, of which 3,978 persons aged 18–34 years were included in this study, answered a postal questionnaire, which represents 59% of the random sample. A logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between the social capital variables and ever having experienced cannabis smoking. The multivariate analysis was performed to investigate the importance of possible confounders (age, country of origin and education) on the differences in having experienced cannabis smoking according to social participation, trust and their four combination categories.

Results: Cannabis smoking is not associated with social participation, but positively associated with low trust among both men and women, and the miniaturization of community, i.e. the combination of high social participation and low trust, among men.

Conclusions: This study suggests that the miniaturization of community, i.e. the combination of high social participation and low levels of generalized trust of other people, may enhance the experience of cannabis smoking. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
social participation, social capital, cannabis smoking, miniaturization of community, trust
in
European Journal of Public Health
volume
14
issue
2
pages
204 - 208
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000221294800021
  • pmid:15230512
  • scopus:3042686508
ISSN
1101-1262
DOI
10.1093/eurpub/14.2.204
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2f1dd696-3bc3-4623-83a7-216024edc83b (old id 126056)
date added to LUP
2007-07-24 14:32:49
date last changed
2017-07-02 03:45:05
@article{2f1dd696-3bc3-4623-83a7-216024edc83b,
  abstract     = {Objectives: The impact of social participation, trust and the miniaturization of community, i.e. the combination of high social participation and low trust, on cannabis smoking was investigated. <br/><br>
Methods: The 2000 public health survey in Scania is a cross-sectional study. A total of 13,715 persons aged 18–80 years, of which 3,978 persons aged 18–34 years were included in this study, answered a postal questionnaire, which represents 59% of the random sample. A logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between the social capital variables and ever having experienced cannabis smoking. The multivariate analysis was performed to investigate the importance of possible confounders (age, country of origin and education) on the differences in having experienced cannabis smoking according to social participation, trust and their four combination categories. <br/><br>
Results: Cannabis smoking is not associated with social participation, but positively associated with low trust among both men and women, and the miniaturization of community, i.e. the combination of high social participation and low trust, among men. <br/><br>
Conclusions: This study suggests that the miniaturization of community, i.e. the combination of high social participation and low levels of generalized trust of other people, may enhance the experience of cannabis smoking.},
  author       = {Lindström, Martin},
  issn         = {1101-1262},
  keyword      = {social participation,social capital,cannabis smoking,miniaturization of community,trust},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {204--208},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {European Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Social capital, the miniaturization of community and cannabis smoking among young adults.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/14.2.204},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2004},
}