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Electroencephalogram variability in dementia with lewy bodies, Alzheimer's disease and controls.

Andersson, Maria A LU ; Hansson, Oskar LU ; Minthon, Lennart LU ; Rosén, Ingmar LU and Londos, Elisabet LU (2008) In Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders 26(3). p.284-290
Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIM: Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is probably still underdiagnosed in the clinical setting. Previous studies have suggested a relationship between fluctuations in attention and electroencephalogram (EEG) measures. Since fluctuation in attention is a core symptom of DLB, we sought to further explore whether EEG measures could help differentiate DLB from Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy controls. METHODS: The EEGs of 20 patients with DLB, 64 patients with AD and 54 elderly controls were assessed in regard to frequencies, coherence, and variability. RESULTS: Greater variability was seen in delta-band power over 2-second intervals in parietal electrodes of DLB patients. The DLB group had a higher degree of overall coherence... (More)
BACKGROUND/AIM: Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is probably still underdiagnosed in the clinical setting. Previous studies have suggested a relationship between fluctuations in attention and electroencephalogram (EEG) measures. Since fluctuation in attention is a core symptom of DLB, we sought to further explore whether EEG measures could help differentiate DLB from Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy controls. METHODS: The EEGs of 20 patients with DLB, 64 patients with AD and 54 elderly controls were assessed in regard to frequencies, coherence, and variability. RESULTS: Greater variability was seen in delta-band power over 2-second intervals in parietal electrodes of DLB patients. The DLB group had a higher degree of overall coherence in the delta band and a lower degree of overall coherence in the alpha band than the other groups. Finally, EEG measures could distinguish DLB patients from AD patients and controls with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves ranging between 0.75 and 0.80 and between 0.91 and 0.97, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that the difference in variability may be associated with the fluctuating cognition seen in DLB. This might have clinical implications as guidance in the diagnosis of DLB. The EEG analysis is simple enough to be possible to apply in clinical practice. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
volume
26
issue
3
pages
284 - 290
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • wos:000259876400015
  • pmid:18841014
  • scopus:54749092594
ISSN
1420-8008
DOI
10.1159/000160962
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e3bf827d-8833-431b-8883-e082dbe4f826 (old id 1262432)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18841014?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-11-10 16:41:35
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:22:14
@article{e3bf827d-8833-431b-8883-e082dbe4f826,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND/AIM: Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is probably still underdiagnosed in the clinical setting. Previous studies have suggested a relationship between fluctuations in attention and electroencephalogram (EEG) measures. Since fluctuation in attention is a core symptom of DLB, we sought to further explore whether EEG measures could help differentiate DLB from Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy controls. METHODS: The EEGs of 20 patients with DLB, 64 patients with AD and 54 elderly controls were assessed in regard to frequencies, coherence, and variability. RESULTS: Greater variability was seen in delta-band power over 2-second intervals in parietal electrodes of DLB patients. The DLB group had a higher degree of overall coherence in the delta band and a lower degree of overall coherence in the alpha band than the other groups. Finally, EEG measures could distinguish DLB patients from AD patients and controls with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves ranging between 0.75 and 0.80 and between 0.91 and 0.97, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that the difference in variability may be associated with the fluctuating cognition seen in DLB. This might have clinical implications as guidance in the diagnosis of DLB. The EEG analysis is simple enough to be possible to apply in clinical practice.},
  author       = {Andersson, Maria A and Hansson, Oskar and Minthon, Lennart and Rosén, Ingmar and Londos, Elisabet},
  issn         = {1420-8008},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {284--290},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders},
  title        = {Electroencephalogram variability in dementia with lewy bodies, Alzheimer's disease and controls.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000160962},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2008},
}