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Vasomotor symptoms are associated with a lower bone mineral density.

Gast, Gerrie-Cor; Grobbee, Diederick; Pop, Victor; Keyzer, Jules; Wijnands-van Gent, Colette; Samsioe, Göran LU ; Nilsson, Peter LU and van der Schouw, Yvonne (2009) In Menopause 16. p.231-238
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:: The severity of vasomotor symptoms has been hypothesized to be linked to a lower bone mineral density (BMD). We examined whether women with vasomotor symptoms are different from women without symptoms with regard to BMD. DESIGN:: We used data from a population-based sample of 5,600 women, aged 46 to 57 years and free from bone diseases, who participated in the first cross-sectional part of the Eindhoven Perimenopausal Osteoporosis Study between 1994 and 1995. Questionnaires at baseline were used to collect data on vasomotor symptoms and potential confounders. At baseline, BMD of the lumbar spine was measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Linear regression analysis was used to analyze the data. RESULTS:: Flushing was... (More)
OBJECTIVE:: The severity of vasomotor symptoms has been hypothesized to be linked to a lower bone mineral density (BMD). We examined whether women with vasomotor symptoms are different from women without symptoms with regard to BMD. DESIGN:: We used data from a population-based sample of 5,600 women, aged 46 to 57 years and free from bone diseases, who participated in the first cross-sectional part of the Eindhoven Perimenopausal Osteoporosis Study between 1994 and 1995. Questionnaires at baseline were used to collect data on vasomotor symptoms and potential confounders. At baseline, BMD of the lumbar spine was measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Linear regression analysis was used to analyze the data. RESULTS:: Flushing was reported by 39% of all women, and night sweats, by 38% of all women. The average BMD was 1.01 +/- 0.14 g/cm and decreased with increasing frequency of flushing (P for trend < 0.0001) and night sweats (P for trend = 0.03). After multivariate adjustments for age, body mass index, menopause status, smoking, education, exercise, and hormone use, women with the highest frequency of symptoms had a 0.022 g/cm (95% CI, -0.03 to -0.01) lower BMD compared with asymptomatic women. Women who reported having the highest frequency of night sweats had a 0.011 g/cm (95% CI, -0.02 to -0.001) lower BMD compared with women with no symptoms of night sweats. CONCLUSIONS:: Our findings show that vasomotor symptoms are associated with reduced bone density. It could be hypothesized that women with vasomotor symptoms might be more susceptible to the beneficial effects of estrogens, possibly by neutralizing the effect of estrogen fluctuations. Further research is needed to extend these findings to other estrogen-sensitive end organs. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Menopause
volume
16
pages
231 - 238
publisher
Lippincott-Raven Publishers
external identifiers
  • wos:000264064100005
  • pmid:19034053
  • scopus:67649329755
ISSN
1530-0374
DOI
10.1097/gme.0b013e318185e25b
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
81947931-3ef8-4334-9af9-2ade8f96afe9 (old id 1271101)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19034053?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-12-03 13:52:54
date last changed
2017-07-30 04:47:37
@article{81947931-3ef8-4334-9af9-2ade8f96afe9,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE:: The severity of vasomotor symptoms has been hypothesized to be linked to a lower bone mineral density (BMD). We examined whether women with vasomotor symptoms are different from women without symptoms with regard to BMD. DESIGN:: We used data from a population-based sample of 5,600 women, aged 46 to 57 years and free from bone diseases, who participated in the first cross-sectional part of the Eindhoven Perimenopausal Osteoporosis Study between 1994 and 1995. Questionnaires at baseline were used to collect data on vasomotor symptoms and potential confounders. At baseline, BMD of the lumbar spine was measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Linear regression analysis was used to analyze the data. RESULTS:: Flushing was reported by 39% of all women, and night sweats, by 38% of all women. The average BMD was 1.01 +/- 0.14 g/cm and decreased with increasing frequency of flushing (P for trend &lt; 0.0001) and night sweats (P for trend = 0.03). After multivariate adjustments for age, body mass index, menopause status, smoking, education, exercise, and hormone use, women with the highest frequency of symptoms had a 0.022 g/cm (95% CI, -0.03 to -0.01) lower BMD compared with asymptomatic women. Women who reported having the highest frequency of night sweats had a 0.011 g/cm (95% CI, -0.02 to -0.001) lower BMD compared with women with no symptoms of night sweats. CONCLUSIONS:: Our findings show that vasomotor symptoms are associated with reduced bone density. It could be hypothesized that women with vasomotor symptoms might be more susceptible to the beneficial effects of estrogens, possibly by neutralizing the effect of estrogen fluctuations. Further research is needed to extend these findings to other estrogen-sensitive end organs.},
  author       = {Gast, Gerrie-Cor and Grobbee, Diederick and Pop, Victor and Keyzer, Jules and Wijnands-van Gent, Colette and Samsioe, Göran and Nilsson, Peter and van der Schouw, Yvonne},
  issn         = {1530-0374},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {231--238},
  publisher    = {Lippincott-Raven Publishers},
  series       = {Menopause},
  title        = {Vasomotor symptoms are associated with a lower bone mineral density.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/gme.0b013e318185e25b},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2009},
}