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Metabolism of sphingolipids in the gut and its relation to inflammation and cancer development.

Duan, Rui-Dong LU and Nilsson, Åke LU (2009) In Progress in lipid research 48(1). p.62-72
Abstract
Sphingolipids are abundant in the microvillar membrane of intestinal epithelial cells where they are essential for structural integrity and may act as receptors for toxins, virus and bacteria. Metabolism of dietary and membrane sphingolipids in the intestine generates ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and ceramide-1-phosphate, via the action of alkaline sphingomyelinase, neutral ceramidase, sphingosine-1-kinase, and ceramide-1-kinase. These intermediary metabolites act as bioactive lipid messengers, influencing numerous cellular functions including growth, differentiation and apoptosis of both epithelial and immunocompetent cells in the gastrointestinal tract, and also the progress of inflammation and responsiveness of the... (More)
Sphingolipids are abundant in the microvillar membrane of intestinal epithelial cells where they are essential for structural integrity and may act as receptors for toxins, virus and bacteria. Metabolism of dietary and membrane sphingolipids in the intestine generates ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and ceramide-1-phosphate, via the action of alkaline sphingomyelinase, neutral ceramidase, sphingosine-1-kinase, and ceramide-1-kinase. These intermediary metabolites act as bioactive lipid messengers, influencing numerous cellular functions including growth, differentiation and apoptosis of both epithelial and immunocompetent cells in the gastrointestinal tract, and also the progress of inflammation and responsiveness of the mucosal cells to pathogens. This review summarizes background and recent progress in the metabolism of dietary and endogenous sphingolipids in the gut and its pathophysiological implications. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Progress in lipid research
volume
48
issue
1
pages
62 - 72
external identifiers
  • wos:000262563300005
  • pmid:19027789
  • scopus:57649188727
ISSN
1873-2194
DOI
10.1016/j.plipres.2008.04.003
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
052de26c-ff4b-467a-a002-a82a99047e46 (old id 1271176)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19027789?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-12-03 11:26:04
date last changed
2017-08-20 04:41:12
@article{052de26c-ff4b-467a-a002-a82a99047e46,
  abstract     = {Sphingolipids are abundant in the microvillar membrane of intestinal epithelial cells where they are essential for structural integrity and may act as receptors for toxins, virus and bacteria. Metabolism of dietary and membrane sphingolipids in the intestine generates ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and ceramide-1-phosphate, via the action of alkaline sphingomyelinase, neutral ceramidase, sphingosine-1-kinase, and ceramide-1-kinase. These intermediary metabolites act as bioactive lipid messengers, influencing numerous cellular functions including growth, differentiation and apoptosis of both epithelial and immunocompetent cells in the gastrointestinal tract, and also the progress of inflammation and responsiveness of the mucosal cells to pathogens. This review summarizes background and recent progress in the metabolism of dietary and endogenous sphingolipids in the gut and its pathophysiological implications.},
  author       = {Duan, Rui-Dong and Nilsson, Åke},
  issn         = {1873-2194},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {62--72},
  series       = {Progress in lipid research},
  title        = {Metabolism of sphingolipids in the gut and its relation to inflammation and cancer development.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.plipres.2008.04.003},
  volume       = {48},
  year         = {2009},
}