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Stuttering, emotions, and heart rate during anticipatory anxiety: a critical review.

Alm, Per A LU (2004) In Journal of Fluency Disorders 29(2). p.123-133
Abstract
Persons who stutter often report their stuttering is influenced by emotional reactions, yet the nature of such relation is still unclear. Psychophysiological studies of stuttering have failed to find any major association between stuttering and the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. A review of published studies of heart rate in relation to stressful speech situations indicate that adults who stutter tend to show a paradoxical reduction of heart rate compared with nonstuttering persons. Reduction of heart rate has also been observed in humans and mammals during anticipation of an unpleasant stimulus, and is proposed to be an indication of anticipatory anxiety resulting in a “freezing response” with parasympathetic inhibition of... (More)
Persons who stutter often report their stuttering is influenced by emotional reactions, yet the nature of such relation is still unclear. Psychophysiological studies of stuttering have failed to find any major association between stuttering and the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. A review of published studies of heart rate in relation to stressful speech situations indicate that adults who stutter tend to show a paradoxical reduction of heart rate compared with nonstuttering persons. Reduction of heart rate has also been observed in humans and mammals during anticipation of an unpleasant stimulus, and is proposed to be an indication of anticipatory anxiety resulting in a “freezing response” with parasympathetic inhibition of the heart rate. It is suggested that speech-related anticipatory anxiety in persons who stutter is likely to be a secondary, conditioned reaction based on previous experiences of stuttering. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Parasympathetic nervous system, Heart rate, Stuttering, Emotions, Freezing
in
Journal of Fluency Disorders
volume
29
issue
2
pages
123 - 133
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000222068900003
  • pmid:15178128
  • scopus:2642574855
ISSN
1873-801X
DOI
10.1016/j.jfludis.2004.02.001
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
67e1c3e6-7b16-4e78-915b-4c7cc775021f (old id 127136)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15178128
date added to LUP
2007-06-21 14:09:17
date last changed
2017-11-26 03:23:21
@article{67e1c3e6-7b16-4e78-915b-4c7cc775021f,
  abstract     = {Persons who stutter often report their stuttering is influenced by emotional reactions, yet the nature of such relation is still unclear. Psychophysiological studies of stuttering have failed to find any major association between stuttering and the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. A review of published studies of heart rate in relation to stressful speech situations indicate that adults who stutter tend to show a paradoxical reduction of heart rate compared with nonstuttering persons. Reduction of heart rate has also been observed in humans and mammals during anticipation of an unpleasant stimulus, and is proposed to be an indication of anticipatory anxiety resulting in a “freezing response” with parasympathetic inhibition of the heart rate. It is suggested that speech-related anticipatory anxiety in persons who stutter is likely to be a secondary, conditioned reaction based on previous experiences of stuttering.},
  author       = {Alm, Per A},
  issn         = {1873-801X},
  keyword      = {Parasympathetic nervous system,Heart rate,Stuttering,Emotions,Freezing},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {123--133},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Fluency Disorders},
  title        = {Stuttering, emotions, and heart rate during anticipatory anxiety: a critical review.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2004.02.001},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2004},
}