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Sociodemographic risk factors of metabolic syndrome in middle-aged women: results from a population-based study of Swedish women, The Women's Health in the Lund Area (WHILA) Study.

Qader, S S; Shakir, Y A; Nyberg, Per LU and Samsioe, Göran LU (2008) In Climacteric 11(6). p.475-482
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a common health problem in menopausal women. According to The Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III, MS includes the combination of three or more of the following risk factors: abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, high blood pressure, high serum triglycerides and low levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol. OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence of the MS in middle-aged women, and the relationships of sociodemographic factors to the MS. METHODS: This analysis covers 10,766 women born between December 2, 1935 and December 1, 1945, living in the Lund area of Sweden by December 1, 1995. RESULTS: We found that 11.6% of women with a mean (+/-standard deviation) age of 56.9 +/- 3.06 years had MS. Women... (More)
BACKGROUND: Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a common health problem in menopausal women. According to The Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III, MS includes the combination of three or more of the following risk factors: abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, high blood pressure, high serum triglycerides and low levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol. OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence of the MS in middle-aged women, and the relationships of sociodemographic factors to the MS. METHODS: This analysis covers 10,766 women born between December 2, 1935 and December 1, 1945, living in the Lund area of Sweden by December 1, 1995. RESULTS: We found that 11.6% of women with a mean (+/-standard deviation) age of 56.9 +/- 3.06 years had MS. Women with MS were older and had higher scores for body weight, body mass index, waist/hip ratio, pulse rate, pulse pressure, serum triglycerides and total serum cholesterol (p < 0.001 for all) compared to the control group. More MS women were smokers, less often consumers of alcohol, and less qualified. In addition, they had low-intensity physical activity at leisure time (p < 0.001) and high-intensity physical activity at work (p = 0.009). Premenopausal women and those treated with hormones had less MS (p < 0.001). Education, physical activity at leisure time, moderate intensity of physical activity at work, alcohol intake and smoking had strong association with MS but work status, household status and dietary habits had no significant association with MS. CONCLUSIONS: Sociodemographic features may contribute to MS. Hence, prevention of MS should encompass sociodemographic features. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Climacteric
volume
11
issue
6
pages
475 - 482
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000260764000007
  • pmid:18991074
  • scopus:57349093497
ISSN
1369-7137
DOI
10.1080/13697130802451787
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0ffd9d68-4761-4f3f-a6a0-e0a300607183 (old id 1271707)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18991074?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-12-01 16:27:54
date last changed
2017-05-28 03:30:43
@article{0ffd9d68-4761-4f3f-a6a0-e0a300607183,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a common health problem in menopausal women. According to The Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III, MS includes the combination of three or more of the following risk factors: abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, high blood pressure, high serum triglycerides and low levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol. OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence of the MS in middle-aged women, and the relationships of sociodemographic factors to the MS. METHODS: This analysis covers 10,766 women born between December 2, 1935 and December 1, 1945, living in the Lund area of Sweden by December 1, 1995. RESULTS: We found that 11.6% of women with a mean (+/-standard deviation) age of 56.9 +/- 3.06 years had MS. Women with MS were older and had higher scores for body weight, body mass index, waist/hip ratio, pulse rate, pulse pressure, serum triglycerides and total serum cholesterol (p &lt; 0.001 for all) compared to the control group. More MS women were smokers, less often consumers of alcohol, and less qualified. In addition, they had low-intensity physical activity at leisure time (p &lt; 0.001) and high-intensity physical activity at work (p = 0.009). Premenopausal women and those treated with hormones had less MS (p &lt; 0.001). Education, physical activity at leisure time, moderate intensity of physical activity at work, alcohol intake and smoking had strong association with MS but work status, household status and dietary habits had no significant association with MS. CONCLUSIONS: Sociodemographic features may contribute to MS. Hence, prevention of MS should encompass sociodemographic features.},
  author       = {Qader, S S and Shakir, Y A and Nyberg, Per and Samsioe, Göran},
  issn         = {1369-7137},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {475--482},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Climacteric},
  title        = {Sociodemographic risk factors of metabolic syndrome in middle-aged women: results from a population-based study of Swedish women, The Women's Health in the Lund Area (WHILA) Study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13697130802451787},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2008},
}