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An association between Type 2 diabetes and alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency

Sandström, Caroline LU ; Ohlsson, Bodil LU ; Melander, Olle LU ; Westin, Ulla LU ; Mahadeva, R and Janciauskiene, Sabina LU (2008) In Diabetic Medicine 25(11). p.1370-1373
Abstract
Aims alpha(1)-Antitrypsin (AAT) is a serine protease inhibitor which recently has been shown to prevent Type 1 diabetes development, to prolong islet allograft survival and to inhibit pancreatic B-cell apoptosis in vivo. It has also been reported that Type 1 diabetic patients have significantly lower plasma concentrations of AAT, suggesting the potential role of AAT in the pathogenesis of Type 1 diabetes. We have investigated whether plasma AAT levels are altered in Type 2 diabetes. Methods The study included patients with Type 2 diabetes (n = 163) and non-diabetic control subjects matched for age, sex and smoking habits (n = 158) derived from the population-based Malmo Diet and Cancer study. Plasma samples were analysed for AAT... (More)
Aims alpha(1)-Antitrypsin (AAT) is a serine protease inhibitor which recently has been shown to prevent Type 1 diabetes development, to prolong islet allograft survival and to inhibit pancreatic B-cell apoptosis in vivo. It has also been reported that Type 1 diabetic patients have significantly lower plasma concentrations of AAT, suggesting the potential role of AAT in the pathogenesis of Type 1 diabetes. We have investigated whether plasma AAT levels are altered in Type 2 diabetes. Methods The study included patients with Type 2 diabetes (n = 163) and non-diabetic control subjects matched for age, sex and smoking habits (n = 158) derived from the population-based Malmo Diet and Cancer study. Plasma samples were analysed for AAT concentration and phenotype and serum glucose, insulin, C-reactive protein and lipid levels were measured. Glycated haemoglobin was also measured. Results In the diabetic group, the women had higher mean plasma AAT levels than men ( P < 0.05). The mean plasma AAT levels did not differ between diabetic and control subjects. However, the number of individuals with low AAT levels (< 1.0 mg/ml) was 50% higher in the diabetic group (P < 0.05) and the frequency of AAT deficiency genotypes was 50% higher (NS) in diabetic compared with control subjects. In the group of diabetic patients with AAT < 1 mg/ml, AAT directly correlated with systolic blood pressure (P = 0.048) and inversely correlated with waist-hip ratio (P = 0.031). Conclusions Our results provide evidence that deficiency of AAT may be associated with an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
inflammation, alpha(1)-antitrypsin, diabetes mellitus
in
Diabetic Medicine
volume
25
issue
11
pages
1370 - 1373
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000260528200019
  • scopus:55149115148
  • pmid:19046232
ISSN
1464-5491
DOI
10.1111/j.1464-5491.2008.02584.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
444d8067-5ac2-484f-9cd7-286d1d6f190e (old id 1284707)
date added to LUP
2009-02-09 09:19:57
date last changed
2017-09-17 06:50:01
@article{444d8067-5ac2-484f-9cd7-286d1d6f190e,
  abstract     = {Aims alpha(1)-Antitrypsin (AAT) is a serine protease inhibitor which recently has been shown to prevent Type 1 diabetes development, to prolong islet allograft survival and to inhibit pancreatic B-cell apoptosis in vivo. It has also been reported that Type 1 diabetic patients have significantly lower plasma concentrations of AAT, suggesting the potential role of AAT in the pathogenesis of Type 1 diabetes. We have investigated whether plasma AAT levels are altered in Type 2 diabetes. Methods The study included patients with Type 2 diabetes (n = 163) and non-diabetic control subjects matched for age, sex and smoking habits (n = 158) derived from the population-based Malmo Diet and Cancer study. Plasma samples were analysed for AAT concentration and phenotype and serum glucose, insulin, C-reactive protein and lipid levels were measured. Glycated haemoglobin was also measured. Results In the diabetic group, the women had higher mean plasma AAT levels than men ( P &lt; 0.05). The mean plasma AAT levels did not differ between diabetic and control subjects. However, the number of individuals with low AAT levels (&lt; 1.0 mg/ml) was 50% higher in the diabetic group (P &lt; 0.05) and the frequency of AAT deficiency genotypes was 50% higher (NS) in diabetic compared with control subjects. In the group of diabetic patients with AAT &lt; 1 mg/ml, AAT directly correlated with systolic blood pressure (P = 0.048) and inversely correlated with waist-hip ratio (P = 0.031). Conclusions Our results provide evidence that deficiency of AAT may be associated with an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.},
  author       = {Sandström, Caroline and Ohlsson, Bodil and Melander, Olle and Westin, Ulla and Mahadeva, R and Janciauskiene, Sabina},
  issn         = {1464-5491},
  keyword      = {inflammation,alpha(1)-antitrypsin,diabetes mellitus},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1370--1373},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Diabetic Medicine},
  title        = {An association between Type 2 diabetes and alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-5491.2008.02584.x},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2008},
}