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Staphylococcus aureus and Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin.

Ekström, Johanna LU ; Forslund, Ola LU and Dillner, Joakim LU (2009) In Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention 18. p.472-478
Abstract
Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin is a tumor with greatly increased incidence among immunosuppressed patients; therefore, an infectious cause of SCC has long been sought. We performed a hospital-based case-control study of Staphylococcus aureus and biopsies of SCC (n = 82), basal cell carcinoma (n = 142), actinic keratosis (n = 57), and seborrhoeic keratosis (n = 72) in comparison with biopsies from healthy skin of these 353 immunocompetent patients. In a S. aureus-specific PCR, targeting the nuc gene, presence of S. aureus DNA was strongly associated with SCC (29.3% positive specimens; adjusted odds ratio, 6.23; 95% confidence interval, 3.10-12.53) compared with healthy skin (5.7% positive specimens). There was also a tendency for... (More)
Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin is a tumor with greatly increased incidence among immunosuppressed patients; therefore, an infectious cause of SCC has long been sought. We performed a hospital-based case-control study of Staphylococcus aureus and biopsies of SCC (n = 82), basal cell carcinoma (n = 142), actinic keratosis (n = 57), and seborrhoeic keratosis (n = 72) in comparison with biopsies from healthy skin of these 353 immunocompetent patients. In a S. aureus-specific PCR, targeting the nuc gene, presence of S. aureus DNA was strongly associated with SCC (29.3% positive specimens; adjusted odds ratio, 6.23; 95% confidence interval, 3.10-12.53) compared with healthy skin (5.7% positive specimens). There was also a tendency for association of S. aureus with actinic keratosis, but no association was found for basal cell carcinoma or seborrhoeic keratosis. Analysis using cotton swab samples taken on top of the lesions and from healthy skin gave similar results (adjusted odds ratio for SCC compared with healthy skin, 2.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.47-4.83). In conclusion, there is a strong association between SCC and presence of S. aureus. The study design used cannot determine whether the association implies that presence of S. aureus might influence carcinogenesis or whether it may imply that SCC has an increased susceptibility to S. aureus colonization. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2009;18(2):OF1-7). (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention
volume
18
pages
472 - 478
publisher
American Association for Cancer Research
external identifiers
  • wos:000263547800014
  • pmid:19155437
  • scopus:60549112375
ISSN
1538-7755
DOI
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-0905
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2c5674f3-6419-448d-9fcc-d1d1661183fc (old id 1289500)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19155437?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-02-04 13:06:41
date last changed
2017-04-16 04:24:31
@article{2c5674f3-6419-448d-9fcc-d1d1661183fc,
  abstract     = {Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin is a tumor with greatly increased incidence among immunosuppressed patients; therefore, an infectious cause of SCC has long been sought. We performed a hospital-based case-control study of Staphylococcus aureus and biopsies of SCC (n = 82), basal cell carcinoma (n = 142), actinic keratosis (n = 57), and seborrhoeic keratosis (n = 72) in comparison with biopsies from healthy skin of these 353 immunocompetent patients. In a S. aureus-specific PCR, targeting the nuc gene, presence of S. aureus DNA was strongly associated with SCC (29.3% positive specimens; adjusted odds ratio, 6.23; 95% confidence interval, 3.10-12.53) compared with healthy skin (5.7% positive specimens). There was also a tendency for association of S. aureus with actinic keratosis, but no association was found for basal cell carcinoma or seborrhoeic keratosis. Analysis using cotton swab samples taken on top of the lesions and from healthy skin gave similar results (adjusted odds ratio for SCC compared with healthy skin, 2.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.47-4.83). In conclusion, there is a strong association between SCC and presence of S. aureus. The study design used cannot determine whether the association implies that presence of S. aureus might influence carcinogenesis or whether it may imply that SCC has an increased susceptibility to S. aureus colonization. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2009;18(2):OF1-7).},
  author       = {Ekström, Johanna and Forslund, Ola and Dillner, Joakim},
  issn         = {1538-7755},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {472--478},
  publisher    = {American Association for Cancer Research},
  series       = {Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention},
  title        = {Staphylococcus aureus and Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-0905},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2009},
}