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Influence of ionic calcium concentration on fouling during the cross-flow microfiltration of b-lactoglobulin solutions.

Marshall, A D; Munro, P and Trägårdh, Gun LU (2003) In Journal of Membrane Science 217(1-2). p.131-140
Abstract
The microfiltration (MF) fouling behaviour of -lactoglobulin solutions containing various levels of ionic calcium was investigated on a constant-flux, computer-controlled, cross-flow rig using zirconium oxide membranes. Fouling behaviour was highly dependent on both permeate flux and calcium concentration. At 200 l/(m2 h) on a 50 nm membrane the presence of 8.0 mmol/dm3 (8.0 mM) ionic calcium in the feed increased fouling resistance dramatically. The presence of 8.0 mmol/dm3 (8.0 mM) ionic calcium had little effect on protein transmission at 50 l/(m2 h) but decreased protein transmission dramatically from about 90% to about 10% at 200 l/(m2 h). Most of the additional fouling observed in the presence of calcium was reversible, i.e. removed... (More)
The microfiltration (MF) fouling behaviour of -lactoglobulin solutions containing various levels of ionic calcium was investigated on a constant-flux, computer-controlled, cross-flow rig using zirconium oxide membranes. Fouling behaviour was highly dependent on both permeate flux and calcium concentration. At 200 l/(m2 h) on a 50 nm membrane the presence of 8.0 mmol/dm3 (8.0 mM) ionic calcium in the feed increased fouling resistance dramatically. The presence of 8.0 mmol/dm3 (8.0 mM) ionic calcium had little effect on protein transmission at 50 l/(m2 h) but decreased protein transmission dramatically from about 90% to about 10% at 200 l/(m2 h). Most of the additional fouling observed in the presence of calcium was reversible, i.e. removed by water flushing. In runs commenced without ionic calcium, addition of 8.0 mmol/dm3 (8.0 mM) ionic calcium after 1 h caused a rapid increase in fouling resistance and a rapid decrease in protein transmission. Similarly in runs commenced with 8.0 mmol/dm3 (8.0 mM) ionic calcium, changing to a calcium-free feed after 1 h caused a decrease in fouling resistance and an increase in protein transmission. Presumably calcium was leached from the deposited fouling layer causing it to "dissolve". The two dominant reactions responsible for these effects of permeate flux and ionic calcium on fouling by -lactoglobulin solutions are probably molecular unfolding by shear and calcium crosslinking. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Microfiltration, Fouling, β-Lactoglobulin, Ionic calcium
in
Journal of Membrane Science
volume
217
issue
1-2
pages
131 - 140
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000183661200012
  • scopus:0038074407
ISSN
0376-7388
DOI
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9b26e58f-8546-4542-a546-0342a43d1173 (old id 129445)
date added to LUP
2007-07-19 08:33:21
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:12:56
@article{9b26e58f-8546-4542-a546-0342a43d1173,
  abstract     = {The microfiltration (MF) fouling behaviour of -lactoglobulin solutions containing various levels of ionic calcium was investigated on a constant-flux, computer-controlled, cross-flow rig using zirconium oxide membranes. Fouling behaviour was highly dependent on both permeate flux and calcium concentration. At 200 l/(m2 h) on a 50 nm membrane the presence of 8.0 mmol/dm3 (8.0 mM) ionic calcium in the feed increased fouling resistance dramatically. The presence of 8.0 mmol/dm3 (8.0 mM) ionic calcium had little effect on protein transmission at 50 l/(m2 h) but decreased protein transmission dramatically from about 90% to about 10% at 200 l/(m2 h). Most of the additional fouling observed in the presence of calcium was reversible, i.e. removed by water flushing. In runs commenced without ionic calcium, addition of 8.0 mmol/dm3 (8.0 mM) ionic calcium after 1 h caused a rapid increase in fouling resistance and a rapid decrease in protein transmission. Similarly in runs commenced with 8.0 mmol/dm3 (8.0 mM) ionic calcium, changing to a calcium-free feed after 1 h caused a decrease in fouling resistance and an increase in protein transmission. Presumably calcium was leached from the deposited fouling layer causing it to "dissolve". The two dominant reactions responsible for these effects of permeate flux and ionic calcium on fouling by -lactoglobulin solutions are probably molecular unfolding by shear and calcium crosslinking.},
  author       = {Marshall, A D and Munro, P and Trägårdh, Gun},
  issn         = {0376-7388},
  keyword      = {Microfiltration,Fouling,β-Lactoglobulin,Ionic calcium},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {131--140},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Membrane Science},
  title        = {Influence of ionic calcium concentration on fouling during the cross-flow microfiltration of b-lactoglobulin solutions.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/},
  volume       = {217},
  year         = {2003},
}