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Evaluation of CSF-tau and CSF-Abeta42 as diagnostic markers for Alzheimer disease in clinical practice

Andreasen, N; Minthon, Lennart LU ; Davidsson, P; Vanmechelen, E; Vanderstichele, H; Winblad, B and Blennow, K (2001) In Archives of Neurology 58(3). p.373-379
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the diagnostic potential of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of tau and beta-amyloid protein ending at amino acid 42 (Abeta42) as biomarkers for Alzheimer disease (AD) in clinical practice. DESIGN: A 1-year prospective study. SETTING: Community population-based sample of all consecutive patients admitted for investigation of cognitive symptoms to the Pitea River Valley Hospital, Pitea, Sweden. PATIENTS: A total of 241 patients with probable AD (n = 105), possible AD (n = 58), vascular dementia (n = 23), mild cognitive impairment (n = 20), Lewy body dementia (n = 9), other neurological disorders (n = 3), and psychiatric disorders (n = 5) and nondemented individuals (n = 18). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cerebrospinal fluid... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the diagnostic potential of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of tau and beta-amyloid protein ending at amino acid 42 (Abeta42) as biomarkers for Alzheimer disease (AD) in clinical practice. DESIGN: A 1-year prospective study. SETTING: Community population-based sample of all consecutive patients admitted for investigation of cognitive symptoms to the Pitea River Valley Hospital, Pitea, Sweden. PATIENTS: A total of 241 patients with probable AD (n = 105), possible AD (n = 58), vascular dementia (n = 23), mild cognitive impairment (n = 20), Lewy body dementia (n = 9), other neurological disorders (n = 3), and psychiatric disorders (n = 5) and nondemented individuals (n = 18). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cerebrospinal fluid tau and CSF-Abeta42 were assayed each week as routine clinical neurochemical analyses. Sensitivity and specificity were defined using the regression line from 100 control subjects from a multicenter study. Positive and negative predictive values were calculated for different prevalence rates of AD. RESULTS: We found increased CSF-tau and decreased CSF-Abeta42 levels in probable and possible AD. Sensitivity was 94% for probable AD, 88% for possible AD, and 75% for mild cognitive impairment, whereas specificity was 100% for psychiatric disorders and 89% for nondemented. Specificity was lower in Lewy body dementia (67%) mainly because of low CSF-Abeta42 levels and in vascular dementia (48%) mainly because of high CSF-tau levels. Sensitivity for CSF-tau and CSF-Abeta42 increased in patients with AD possessing the ApoE epsilon4 allele, approaching 100%. At a prevalence of AD of 45%, the positive predictive value was 90% and the negative predictive value was 95%. CONCLUSIONS: Cerebrospinal fluid tau and CSF-Abeta42 have so far been studied in research settings, under conditions providing data on the optimal performance. We examined a prospective patient sample, with assays run in clinical routine, giving figures closer to the true performance of CSF-tau and CSF-Abeta42. The predictive value for AD was greater than 90%. Therefore, these biomarkers may have a role in the clinical workup of patients with cognitive impairment, especially to differentiate early AD from normal aging and psychiatric disorders. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Archives of Neurology
volume
58
issue
3
pages
373 - 379
publisher
American Medical Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000167441900006
  • scopus:0035108753
ISSN
0003-9942
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
23583b25-2f92-49b6-adce-33d090d88e47 (old id 1297301)
alternative location
http://archneur.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/58/3/373
date added to LUP
2009-07-15 10:18:12
date last changed
2018-04-08 03:29:58
@article{23583b25-2f92-49b6-adce-33d090d88e47,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the diagnostic potential of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of tau and beta-amyloid protein ending at amino acid 42 (Abeta42) as biomarkers for Alzheimer disease (AD) in clinical practice. DESIGN: A 1-year prospective study. SETTING: Community population-based sample of all consecutive patients admitted for investigation of cognitive symptoms to the Pitea River Valley Hospital, Pitea, Sweden. PATIENTS: A total of 241 patients with probable AD (n = 105), possible AD (n = 58), vascular dementia (n = 23), mild cognitive impairment (n = 20), Lewy body dementia (n = 9), other neurological disorders (n = 3), and psychiatric disorders (n = 5) and nondemented individuals (n = 18). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cerebrospinal fluid tau and CSF-Abeta42 were assayed each week as routine clinical neurochemical analyses. Sensitivity and specificity were defined using the regression line from 100 control subjects from a multicenter study. Positive and negative predictive values were calculated for different prevalence rates of AD. RESULTS: We found increased CSF-tau and decreased CSF-Abeta42 levels in probable and possible AD. Sensitivity was 94% for probable AD, 88% for possible AD, and 75% for mild cognitive impairment, whereas specificity was 100% for psychiatric disorders and 89% for nondemented. Specificity was lower in Lewy body dementia (67%) mainly because of low CSF-Abeta42 levels and in vascular dementia (48%) mainly because of high CSF-tau levels. Sensitivity for CSF-tau and CSF-Abeta42 increased in patients with AD possessing the ApoE epsilon4 allele, approaching 100%. At a prevalence of AD of 45%, the positive predictive value was 90% and the negative predictive value was 95%. CONCLUSIONS: Cerebrospinal fluid tau and CSF-Abeta42 have so far been studied in research settings, under conditions providing data on the optimal performance. We examined a prospective patient sample, with assays run in clinical routine, giving figures closer to the true performance of CSF-tau and CSF-Abeta42. The predictive value for AD was greater than 90%. Therefore, these biomarkers may have a role in the clinical workup of patients with cognitive impairment, especially to differentiate early AD from normal aging and psychiatric disorders.},
  author       = {Andreasen, N and Minthon, Lennart and Davidsson, P and Vanmechelen, E and Vanderstichele, H and Winblad, B and Blennow, K},
  issn         = {0003-9942},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {373--379},
  publisher    = {American Medical Association},
  series       = {Archives of Neurology},
  title        = {Evaluation of CSF-tau and CSF-Abeta42 as diagnostic markers for Alzheimer disease in clinical practice},
  volume       = {58},
  year         = {2001},
}