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The Decomposition of Shared Environmental Influences on Externalizing Syndromes in the Swedish Population : A Multivariate Study

Ohlsson, Henrik LU ; Kendler, Kenneth S. LU ; Lichtenstein, Paul; Sundquist, Jan LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2017) In Twin Research and Human Genetics 20(4). p.298-309
Abstract

Using information from Swedish population registries, we attempt to decompose the shared environment (C) into four subcomponents: close family, family, household, and community. Among pairs differing in their genetic and geographical/household relationships, we examine three externalizing syndromes: drug abuse (DA), criminal behavior (CB), and alcohol use disorders (AUD). The best-fitting common pathway model suggested that total estimates for C were higher for DA (21% for males and 18% for females) than for AUD (16% and 14%) and CB (17% and 10%). Concerning syndrome-specific influences in males, close family effects were stronger for CB and AUD, while community effects were stronger for DA. The two C components in between community... (More)

Using information from Swedish population registries, we attempt to decompose the shared environment (C) into four subcomponents: close family, family, household, and community. Among pairs differing in their genetic and geographical/household relationships, we examine three externalizing syndromes: drug abuse (DA), criminal behavior (CB), and alcohol use disorders (AUD). The best-fitting common pathway model suggested that total estimates for C were higher for DA (21% for males and 18% for females) than for AUD (16% and 14%) and CB (17% and 10%). Concerning syndrome-specific influences in males, close family effects were stronger for CB and AUD, while community effects were stronger for DA. The two C components in between community experiences and close family experiences (family and household) were estimated to almost entirely derive from the common latent factor. In females, among the four components of C, the community experiences were just slightly above zero, while the C components referred to as the household effect were almost zero. The total close family experiences were similar and most important across syndromes were also divided into common and specific components. For all syndromes, for both males and females, the effects of additive genetic factors were 2-4 times the size of the total effect of the shared environment. Applying standard methods to novel relationships, we expand our understanding of how the shared environment contributes to individual differences in three externalizing syndromes.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
close family, community, externalizing syndromes, family, household, shared environment
in
Twin Research and Human Genetics
volume
20
issue
4
pages
12 pages
publisher
Australian Academic Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:85020203992
  • wos:000406058700005
ISSN
1832-4274
DOI
10.1017/thg.2017.31
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
12d9f579-ee40-4022-a714-27ecd27092a1
date added to LUP
2017-08-14 10:25:03
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:41:40
@article{12d9f579-ee40-4022-a714-27ecd27092a1,
  abstract     = {<p>Using information from Swedish population registries, we attempt to decompose the shared environment (C) into four subcomponents: close family, family, household, and community. Among pairs differing in their genetic and geographical/household relationships, we examine three externalizing syndromes: drug abuse (DA), criminal behavior (CB), and alcohol use disorders (AUD). The best-fitting common pathway model suggested that total estimates for C were higher for DA (21% for males and 18% for females) than for AUD (16% and 14%) and CB (17% and 10%). Concerning syndrome-specific influences in males, close family effects were stronger for CB and AUD, while community effects were stronger for DA. The two C components in between community experiences and close family experiences (family and household) were estimated to almost entirely derive from the common latent factor. In females, among the four components of C, the community experiences were just slightly above zero, while the C components referred to as the household effect were almost zero. The total close family experiences were similar and most important across syndromes were also divided into common and specific components. For all syndromes, for both males and females, the effects of additive genetic factors were 2-4 times the size of the total effect of the shared environment. Applying standard methods to novel relationships, we expand our understanding of how the shared environment contributes to individual differences in three externalizing syndromes.</p>},
  author       = {Ohlsson, Henrik and Kendler, Kenneth S. and Lichtenstein, Paul and Sundquist, Jan and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {1832-4274},
  keyword      = {close family,community,externalizing syndromes,family,household,shared environment},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {298--309},
  publisher    = {Australian Academic Press},
  series       = {Twin Research and Human Genetics},
  title        = {The Decomposition of Shared Environmental Influences on Externalizing Syndromes in the Swedish Population : A Multivariate Study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/thg.2017.31},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2017},
}