Advanced

Calcium metabolism and breast cancer risk

Almquist, Martin LU (2009) In Lund University, Faculty of Medicine Doctoral Dissertation Series 2009:30.
Abstract
Emerging evidence suggests that calcium and its regulating hormones, i.e. vitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH), affect breast cancer risk.

The associations between serum calcium levels and breast cancer risk, between serum calcium levels and known risk factors of breast cancer, and between serum calcium levels and breast cancer aggressiveness were examined within the Malmö Preventive Project, a population-based cohort comprising 10,902 women. Serum calcium, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and PTH-levels were furthermore examined in relation to breast cancer risk in a nested case-control study comprising 764 breast cancer cases within the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study.

Serum calcium levels were positively associated with... (More)
Emerging evidence suggests that calcium and its regulating hormones, i.e. vitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH), affect breast cancer risk.

The associations between serum calcium levels and breast cancer risk, between serum calcium levels and known risk factors of breast cancer, and between serum calcium levels and breast cancer aggressiveness were examined within the Malmö Preventive Project, a population-based cohort comprising 10,902 women. Serum calcium, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and PTH-levels were furthermore examined in relation to breast cancer risk in a nested case-control study comprising 764 breast cancer cases within the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study.

Serum calcium levels were positively associated with breast cancer risk in overweight/obese women. In premenopausal women, serum calcium was in one study negatively, and in one study positively, associated with breast cancer. Calcium was positively associated with breast cancer aggressiveness in overweight and/or premenopausal women. Premenopausal status and use of oral contraceptives and hormone-replacement therapy were negatively associated with serum calcium levels. BMI was significantly associated with serum calcium levels, with lean and overweight women having higher calcium levels than women with BMI between 20 and 25.

There was a weak, statistically non-significant, inverse association between 25OHD-levels and breast cancer risk. There was no evidence for any relation between PTH-levels and breast cancer.

It is concluded that serum calcium is positively associated with breast cancer risk and aggressiveness in overweight women. There may be a weak negative association between vitamin D and breast cancer risk, but this will have to be further examined. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
supervisor
opponent
  • Professor Frisell, Jan, Karolinska Hospital, Solna, Stockholm
organization
publishing date
type
Thesis
publication status
published
subject
keywords
calcium, breast cancer, vitamin D, body mass index, menopause, parathyroid hormone
in
Lund University, Faculty of Medicine Doctoral Dissertation Series
volume
2009:30
pages
92 pages
publisher
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University
defense location
Lilla aulan, Medicinskt Forskningscentrum, ing 59, UMAS, Malmö
defense date
2009-03-27 13:00
ISSN
1652-8220
ISBN
978-91-86253-17-2
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b682101a-79dc-43cd-b6cd-d287d3a1f0c2 (old id 1301859)
date added to LUP
2009-03-03 11:51:56
date last changed
2016-09-19 08:44:51
@phdthesis{b682101a-79dc-43cd-b6cd-d287d3a1f0c2,
  abstract     = {Emerging evidence suggests that calcium and its regulating hormones, i.e. vitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH), affect breast cancer risk. <br/><br>
The associations between serum calcium levels and breast cancer risk, between serum calcium levels and known risk factors of breast cancer, and between serum calcium levels and breast cancer aggressiveness were examined within the Malmö Preventive Project, a population-based cohort comprising 10,902 women. Serum calcium, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and PTH-levels were furthermore examined in relation to breast cancer risk in a nested case-control study comprising 764 breast cancer cases within the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study.<br/><br>
Serum calcium levels were positively associated with breast cancer risk in overweight/obese women. In premenopausal women, serum calcium was in one study negatively, and in one study positively, associated with breast cancer. Calcium was positively associated with breast cancer aggressiveness in overweight and/or premenopausal women. Premenopausal status and use of oral contraceptives and hormone-replacement therapy were negatively associated with serum calcium levels. BMI was significantly associated with serum calcium levels, with lean and overweight women having higher calcium levels than women with BMI between 20 and 25. <br/><br>
There was a weak, statistically non-significant, inverse association between 25OHD-levels and breast cancer risk. There was no evidence for any relation between PTH-levels and breast cancer. <br/><br>
It is concluded that serum calcium is positively associated with breast cancer risk and aggressiveness in overweight women. There may be a weak negative association between vitamin D and breast cancer risk, but this will have to be further examined.},
  author       = {Almquist, Martin},
  isbn         = {978-91-86253-17-2},
  issn         = {1652-8220},
  keyword      = {calcium,breast cancer,vitamin D,body mass index,menopause,parathyroid hormone},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {92},
  publisher    = {Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University},
  school       = {Lund University},
  series       = {Lund University, Faculty of Medicine Doctoral Dissertation Series},
  title        = {Calcium metabolism and breast cancer risk},
  volume       = {2009:30},
  year         = {2009},
}