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Effects of Clara cell 10 (CC10) protein on symptoms and signs of allergic rhinitis.

Widegren, Henrik LU ; Andersson, Morgan LU and Greiff, Lennart LU (2009) In Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology 102(1). p.51-56
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Clara cell 10 (CC10) protein is produced by the airway epithelium. Reduced levels of CC10 are associated with allergic rhinitis and asthma. In experimental models, treatment with the CC10 protein may reduce features of airway inflammation. OBJECTIVES: To examine whether or not topical treatment with recombinant human CC10 (rhCC10) affects symptoms and signs of allergic rhinitis in a pollen season model. METHODS: Out of the pollen season, patients with allergic rhinitis received treatment with rhCC10, 0.56 mg per nasal cavity, once daily for 7 days in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover design. During this period, individualized allergen challenges were given once daily. Symptoms and peak nasal inspiratory flow... (More)
BACKGROUND: The Clara cell 10 (CC10) protein is produced by the airway epithelium. Reduced levels of CC10 are associated with allergic rhinitis and asthma. In experimental models, treatment with the CC10 protein may reduce features of airway inflammation. OBJECTIVES: To examine whether or not topical treatment with recombinant human CC10 (rhCC10) affects symptoms and signs of allergic rhinitis in a pollen season model. METHODS: Out of the pollen season, patients with allergic rhinitis received treatment with rhCC10, 0.56 mg per nasal cavity, once daily for 7 days in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover design. During this period, individualized allergen challenges were given once daily. Symptoms and peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) were recorded daily in the morning, 10 minutes after challenge, and in the evening. Mean recordings of the last 3 days of the challenge series were used in the analysis. Nasal lavages were performed at the end of each challenge period, and eosinophil cationic protein, myeloperoxidase, and alpha2-macroglobulin levels were measured as indices of eosinophil and neutrophil activity and plasma exudation, respectively. RESULTS: Recombinant human CC10 did not affect allergen-induced morning, postchallenge, or evening symptoms compared with placebo. Morning, postchallenge, and evening PNIF were not improved by rhCC10. No statistically significant differences were observed between rhCC10 and placebo for any of the lavage fluid indices. CONCLUSIONS: Repeated nasal administrations of rhCC10 protein, in the present dose, do not exert antiallergic effects in seasonal allergic rhinitis. (Less)
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organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology
volume
102
issue
1
pages
51 - 56
publisher
American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology
external identifiers
  • wos:000262333300010
  • pmid:19205286
  • scopus:59449098503
ISSN
1081-1206
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2d2f9905-a4f8-4819-b9ba-bce5ad38e19f (old id 1302736)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19205286?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-03-05 16:36:28
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:31:02
@article{2d2f9905-a4f8-4819-b9ba-bce5ad38e19f,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: The Clara cell 10 (CC10) protein is produced by the airway epithelium. Reduced levels of CC10 are associated with allergic rhinitis and asthma. In experimental models, treatment with the CC10 protein may reduce features of airway inflammation. OBJECTIVES: To examine whether or not topical treatment with recombinant human CC10 (rhCC10) affects symptoms and signs of allergic rhinitis in a pollen season model. METHODS: Out of the pollen season, patients with allergic rhinitis received treatment with rhCC10, 0.56 mg per nasal cavity, once daily for 7 days in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover design. During this period, individualized allergen challenges were given once daily. Symptoms and peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) were recorded daily in the morning, 10 minutes after challenge, and in the evening. Mean recordings of the last 3 days of the challenge series were used in the analysis. Nasal lavages were performed at the end of each challenge period, and eosinophil cationic protein, myeloperoxidase, and alpha2-macroglobulin levels were measured as indices of eosinophil and neutrophil activity and plasma exudation, respectively. RESULTS: Recombinant human CC10 did not affect allergen-induced morning, postchallenge, or evening symptoms compared with placebo. Morning, postchallenge, and evening PNIF were not improved by rhCC10. No statistically significant differences were observed between rhCC10 and placebo for any of the lavage fluid indices. CONCLUSIONS: Repeated nasal administrations of rhCC10 protein, in the present dose, do not exert antiallergic effects in seasonal allergic rhinitis.},
  author       = {Widegren, Henrik and Andersson, Morgan and Greiff, Lennart},
  issn         = {1081-1206},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {51--56},
  publisher    = {American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology},
  series       = {Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology},
  title        = {Effects of Clara cell 10 (CC10) protein on symptoms and signs of allergic rhinitis.},
  volume       = {102},
  year         = {2009},
}