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A Report on the International Transglutaminase Autoantibody Workshop for Celiac Disease

Li, Marcella; Yu, Liping; Tiberti, Claudio; Bonamico, Margherita; Taki, Iman; Miao, Dongmei; Murray, Joseph A.; Rewers, Marian J.; Hoffenberg, Edward J. and Agardh, Daniel LU , et al. (2009) In American Journal of Gastroenterology 104(1). p.154-163
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Measurement of transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGAA) is considered to be the most efficient single serologic test for celiac disease (CD) by the American Gastroenterological Association Institute. We hypothesized that a large international collaborative effort toward improving and standardizing TGAA measurement is both feasible and necessary. The primary aim of this workshop is to compare TGAA assays among various research and clinical laboratories and examine assay concordance and improve (and eventually standardize) the TGAA assay. METHODS: A total of 20 laboratories (5 commercial laboratories, 15 research and clinical laboratories) participated that included enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and radiobinding assays.... (More)
OBJECTIVES: Measurement of transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGAA) is considered to be the most efficient single serologic test for celiac disease (CD) by the American Gastroenterological Association Institute. We hypothesized that a large international collaborative effort toward improving and standardizing TGAA measurement is both feasible and necessary. The primary aim of this workshop is to compare TGAA assays among various research and clinical laboratories and examine assay concordance and improve (and eventually standardize) the TGAA assay. METHODS: A total of 20 laboratories (5 commercial laboratories, 15 research and clinical laboratories) participated that included enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and radiobinding assays. A total of 150 serum samples were distributed to each laboratory, with each laboratory receiving an equal aliquot that was coded and blinded, composed of 100 healthy control sera and 50 CD sera. RESULTS: Laboratory sensitivity ranged from 69% to 93% and specificity ranged from 96% to 100%. By receiver operator characteristic analysis, the area under the curve (C index) ranged from 0.9488 to 0.9904. When analyzing for linear correlation, r-squared was as high as 0.8882 but as low as 0.4244 for the celiac samples between different laboratories performing ELISA. CONCLUSIONS: This transglutaminase autoantibody workshop allows for larger-scale international participation for the purposes of improving and eventually standardizing the TGAA assay with subsequent workshops. (Less)
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published
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American Journal of Gastroenterology
volume
104
issue
1
pages
154 - 163
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000262265800026
  • scopus:60749134816
ISSN
1572-0241
DOI
10.1038/ajg.2008.8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
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ad6d5517-9fb3-4fe5-9f20-2776c17cd7af (old id 1313479)
date added to LUP
2009-03-09 15:58:45
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2017-11-05 03:38:55
@article{ad6d5517-9fb3-4fe5-9f20-2776c17cd7af,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVES: Measurement of transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGAA) is considered to be the most efficient single serologic test for celiac disease (CD) by the American Gastroenterological Association Institute. We hypothesized that a large international collaborative effort toward improving and standardizing TGAA measurement is both feasible and necessary. The primary aim of this workshop is to compare TGAA assays among various research and clinical laboratories and examine assay concordance and improve (and eventually standardize) the TGAA assay. METHODS: A total of 20 laboratories (5 commercial laboratories, 15 research and clinical laboratories) participated that included enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and radiobinding assays. A total of 150 serum samples were distributed to each laboratory, with each laboratory receiving an equal aliquot that was coded and blinded, composed of 100 healthy control sera and 50 CD sera. RESULTS: Laboratory sensitivity ranged from 69% to 93% and specificity ranged from 96% to 100%. By receiver operator characteristic analysis, the area under the curve (C index) ranged from 0.9488 to 0.9904. When analyzing for linear correlation, r-squared was as high as 0.8882 but as low as 0.4244 for the celiac samples between different laboratories performing ELISA. CONCLUSIONS: This transglutaminase autoantibody workshop allows for larger-scale international participation for the purposes of improving and eventually standardizing the TGAA assay with subsequent workshops.},
  author       = {Li, Marcella and Yu, Liping and Tiberti, Claudio and Bonamico, Margherita and Taki, Iman and Miao, Dongmei and Murray, Joseph A. and Rewers, Marian J. and Hoffenberg, Edward J. and Agardh, Daniel and Mueller, Patricia and Stern, Martin and Bonifacio, Ezio and Liu, Edwin},
  issn         = {1572-0241},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {154--163},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {American Journal of Gastroenterology},
  title        = {A Report on the International Transglutaminase Autoantibody Workshop for Celiac Disease},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2008.8},
  volume       = {104},
  year         = {2009},
}