Advanced

Intermittent and daily smokers: two different socioeconomic patterns, and diverging influence of social participation

Lindström, Martin LU and Östergren, Per-Olof LU (2001) In Tobacco Control 10(3). p.258-266
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate socioeconomic differences in intermittent and daily smoking, and to assess the association between social participation and these two smoking behaviours.DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS/MEASUREMENTS: A population of 11 837 individuals interviewed in 1992-94, aged 45-64 years, was investigated in this cross sectional study. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess socioeconomic differences in daily and intermittent smoking, adjusting for age, country of origin, previous/current diseases, and marital status. Finally, social participation as a measure of social capital was introduced in the multivariate model.RESULTS: When unskilled manual workers were compared to high level non-manual employees, odds... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To investigate socioeconomic differences in intermittent and daily smoking, and to assess the association between social participation and these two smoking behaviours.DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS/MEASUREMENTS: A population of 11 837 individuals interviewed in 1992-94, aged 45-64 years, was investigated in this cross sectional study. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess socioeconomic differences in daily and intermittent smoking, adjusting for age, country of origin, previous/current diseases, and marital status. Finally, social participation as a measure of social capital was introduced in the multivariate model.RESULTS: When unskilled manual workers were compared to high level non-manual employees, odds ratios of 2.3 (95 confidence interval (CI) 1.7 to 3.0) for men and 1.9 (95 CI 1.4 to 2.5) for women were found in regard to daily smoking, but odd ratios of only 0.7 (95 CI 0.4 to 1.2) for men and 1.3 (95 CI 0.7 to 2.4) for women were found in regard to intermittent smoking. A decrease in the daily smoking odds ratios was found when social participation was introduced in the model, while the odds ratios regarding intermittent smoking were unaffected.CONCLUSIONS: There were no socioeconomic differences in intermittent smoking and no association with social participation, a result that contrasts sharply with the patterns of daily smoking. These findings have important implications for the discussion concerning social capital and preventive measures. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Tobacco Control
volume
10
issue
3
pages
258 - 266
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000170974000018
  • scopus:0035460216
ISSN
1468-3318
DOI
10.1136/tc.10.3.258
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
44c0bc42-51ec-4ca9-b57a-c1002ddd7bcf (old id 131695)
date added to LUP
2007-07-24 15:27:46
date last changed
2018-05-29 12:19:05
@article{44c0bc42-51ec-4ca9-b57a-c1002ddd7bcf,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To investigate socioeconomic differences in intermittent and daily smoking, and to assess the association between social participation and these two smoking behaviours.DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS/MEASUREMENTS: A population of 11 837 individuals interviewed in 1992-94, aged 45-64 years, was investigated in this cross sectional study. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess socioeconomic differences in daily and intermittent smoking, adjusting for age, country of origin, previous/current diseases, and marital status. Finally, social participation as a measure of social capital was introduced in the multivariate model.RESULTS: When unskilled manual workers were compared to high level non-manual employees, odds ratios of 2.3 (95 confidence interval (CI) 1.7 to 3.0) for men and 1.9 (95 CI 1.4 to 2.5) for women were found in regard to daily smoking, but odd ratios of only 0.7 (95 CI 0.4 to 1.2) for men and 1.3 (95 CI 0.7 to 2.4) for women were found in regard to intermittent smoking. A decrease in the daily smoking odds ratios was found when social participation was introduced in the model, while the odds ratios regarding intermittent smoking were unaffected.CONCLUSIONS: There were no socioeconomic differences in intermittent smoking and no association with social participation, a result that contrasts sharply with the patterns of daily smoking. These findings have important implications for the discussion concerning social capital and preventive measures.},
  author       = {Lindström, Martin and Östergren, Per-Olof},
  issn         = {1468-3318},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {258--266},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {Tobacco Control},
  title        = {Intermittent and daily smokers: two different socioeconomic patterns, and diverging influence of social participation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/tc.10.3.258},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2001},
}