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Vitamin A helps gut T cells find their way in the dark.

Johansson Lindbom, Bengt LU and Agace, William LU (2004) In Nature Medicine 10(12). p.1300-1301
Abstract
Once activated, some T cells home to distinct sites in the body, such as the intestine and inflamed skin. Research in mice shows that dendritic cells in the gut produce a derivative of vitamin A, retinoic acid, that gives T cells directions.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Nature Medicine
volume
10
issue
12
pages
1300 - 1301
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000225500900021
  • scopus:11144327675
ISSN
1546-170X
DOI
10.1038/nm1204-1300
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1b71cb38-b5b9-43b7-b409-22753e2c5f07 (old id 132145)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=15580252&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-16 09:44:29
date last changed
2017-06-11 04:31:23
@article{1b71cb38-b5b9-43b7-b409-22753e2c5f07,
  abstract     = {Once activated, some T cells home to distinct sites in the body, such as the intestine and inflamed skin. Research in mice shows that dendritic cells in the gut produce a derivative of vitamin A, retinoic acid, that gives T cells directions.},
  author       = {Johansson Lindbom, Bengt and Agace, William},
  issn         = {1546-170X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {1300--1301},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Nature Medicine},
  title        = {Vitamin A helps gut T cells find their way in the dark.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nm1204-1300},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2004},
}