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Variation in aluminium patch test reactivity over time

Siemund, Ingrid LU ; Mowitz, Martin LU ; Zimerson, Erik LU ; Bruze, Magnus LU and Hindsén, Monica LU (2017) In Contact Dermatitis 77(5). p.288-296
Abstract

Background: Contact allergy to aluminium has been reported more frequently in recent years. It has been pointed out that positive patch test reactions to aluminium may not be reproducible on retesting. Objectives: To investigate possible variations in patch test reactivity to aluminium over time. Methods: Twenty-one adults, who had previously reacted positively to aluminium, were patch tested with equimolar dilution series in pet. of aluminium chloride hexahydrate and aluminium lactate, four times over a period of 8months. Results: Thirty-six of 84 (43%) serial dilution tests with aluminium chloride hexahydrate and 49 of 84 (58%) serial dilution tests with aluminium lactate gave negative results. The range of reactivity varied between a... (More)

Background: Contact allergy to aluminium has been reported more frequently in recent years. It has been pointed out that positive patch test reactions to aluminium may not be reproducible on retesting. Objectives: To investigate possible variations in patch test reactivity to aluminium over time. Methods: Twenty-one adults, who had previously reacted positively to aluminium, were patch tested with equimolar dilution series in pet. of aluminium chloride hexahydrate and aluminium lactate, four times over a period of 8months. Results: Thirty-six of 84 (43%) serial dilution tests with aluminium chloride hexahydrate and 49 of 84 (58%) serial dilution tests with aluminium lactate gave negative results. The range of reactivity varied between a negative reaction to aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 10% and/or to aluminium lactate at 12%, and a positive reaction to aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 0.1% and/or to aluminium lactate at 0.12%. The highest individual difference in test reactivity noticed was 320-fold when the two most divergent minimal eliciting concentrations were compared. Conclusions: The patch test reactivity to aluminium varies over time. Aluminium-allergic individuals may have false-negative reactions. Therefore, retesting with aluminium should be considered when there is a strong suspicion of aluminium contact allergy.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Allergic contact dermatitis, Aluminium, Delayed hypersensitivity, Patch testing
in
Contact Dermatitis
volume
77
issue
5
pages
288 - 296
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:85022327574
  • wos:000417570900004
ISSN
0105-1873
DOI
10.1111/cod.12836
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
135571cb-1e89-4ce5-8f9f-aafd9d07c206
date added to LUP
2017-08-22 08:53:51
date last changed
2018-04-15 04:46:37
@article{135571cb-1e89-4ce5-8f9f-aafd9d07c206,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Contact allergy to aluminium has been reported more frequently in recent years. It has been pointed out that positive patch test reactions to aluminium may not be reproducible on retesting. Objectives: To investigate possible variations in patch test reactivity to aluminium over time. Methods: Twenty-one adults, who had previously reacted positively to aluminium, were patch tested with equimolar dilution series in pet. of aluminium chloride hexahydrate and aluminium lactate, four times over a period of 8months. Results: Thirty-six of 84 (43%) serial dilution tests with aluminium chloride hexahydrate and 49 of 84 (58%) serial dilution tests with aluminium lactate gave negative results. The range of reactivity varied between a negative reaction to aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 10% and/or to aluminium lactate at 12%, and a positive reaction to aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 0.1% and/or to aluminium lactate at 0.12%. The highest individual difference in test reactivity noticed was 320-fold when the two most divergent minimal eliciting concentrations were compared. Conclusions: The patch test reactivity to aluminium varies over time. Aluminium-allergic individuals may have false-negative reactions. Therefore, retesting with aluminium should be considered when there is a strong suspicion of aluminium contact allergy.</p>},
  author       = {Siemund, Ingrid and Mowitz, Martin and Zimerson, Erik and Bruze, Magnus and Hindsén, Monica},
  issn         = {0105-1873},
  keyword      = {Allergic contact dermatitis,Aluminium,Delayed hypersensitivity,Patch testing},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {288--296},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Contact Dermatitis},
  title        = {Variation in aluminium patch test reactivity over time},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cod.12836},
  volume       = {77},
  year         = {2017},
}