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Electroencephalography and brain damage in preterm infants.

Hellström-Westas, Lena LU and Rosén, Ingmar LU (2005) In Early Human Development 81(3). p.255-261
Abstract
Electroencephalography (EEG) is a sensitive method for detection of brain injury in preterm infants. Although the acute and chronic EEG changes are mainly non-specific regarding type of injury, they correlate with later neurological and cognitive function. In infants developing periventricular hemorrhagic or ischemic brain injury, acute EEG findings include depression of background activity and presence of epileptic seizure activity. The chronic EEG changes associated with white matter injury and abnormal neurological development include delayed maturation, and presence of abundant rolandic sharp waves. Suboptimal cognitive development in preterm infants has been associated with changes in various sleep measures in EEG’s recorded at full... (More)
Electroencephalography (EEG) is a sensitive method for detection of brain injury in preterm infants. Although the acute and chronic EEG changes are mainly non-specific regarding type of injury, they correlate with later neurological and cognitive function. In infants developing periventricular hemorrhagic or ischemic brain injury, acute EEG findings include depression of background activity and presence of epileptic seizure activity. The chronic EEG changes associated with white matter injury and abnormal neurological development include delayed maturation, and presence of abundant rolandic sharp waves. Suboptimal cognitive development in preterm infants has been associated with changes in various sleep measures in EEG’s recorded at full term. Continuous EEG-monitoring during neonatal intensive care shows that cerebral electrical activity during this vulnerable period can be affected by several extracerebral factors, e.g. cerebral blood flow, acidosis and some commonly used medications. For diagnosis of brain injury in preterm infants with neurophysiological methods, a combination of early continuous EEG monitoring during the initial intensive care period and full EEG, performed at later stages, is probably optimal. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cerebral Function Monitor, aEEG, EEG, preterm, brain injury
in
Early Human Development
volume
81
issue
3
pages
255 - 261
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:15814207
  • wos:000228684100005
  • scopus:16244412289
ISSN
1872-6232
DOI
10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2005.01.006
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f22b68c0-72fa-49d3-a7aa-ae21097a6fc3 (old id 136330)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=15814207&ordinalpos=3&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum
date added to LUP
2007-07-13 16:19:17
date last changed
2017-09-24 04:26:22
@article{f22b68c0-72fa-49d3-a7aa-ae21097a6fc3,
  abstract     = {Electroencephalography (EEG) is a sensitive method for detection of brain injury in preterm infants. Although the acute and chronic EEG changes are mainly non-specific regarding type of injury, they correlate with later neurological and cognitive function. In infants developing periventricular hemorrhagic or ischemic brain injury, acute EEG findings include depression of background activity and presence of epileptic seizure activity. The chronic EEG changes associated with white matter injury and abnormal neurological development include delayed maturation, and presence of abundant rolandic sharp waves. Suboptimal cognitive development in preterm infants has been associated with changes in various sleep measures in EEG’s recorded at full term. Continuous EEG-monitoring during neonatal intensive care shows that cerebral electrical activity during this vulnerable period can be affected by several extracerebral factors, e.g. cerebral blood flow, acidosis and some commonly used medications. For diagnosis of brain injury in preterm infants with neurophysiological methods, a combination of early continuous EEG monitoring during the initial intensive care period and full EEG, performed at later stages, is probably optimal.},
  author       = {Hellström-Westas, Lena and Rosén, Ingmar},
  issn         = {1872-6232},
  keyword      = {Cerebral Function Monitor,aEEG,EEG,preterm,brain injury},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {255--261},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Early Human Development},
  title        = {Electroencephalography and brain damage in preterm infants.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2005.01.006},
  volume       = {81},
  year         = {2005},
}