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Whole-lake carbon-13 additions reveal terrestrial support of aquatic food webs

Pace, M L; Cole, J J; Carpenter, S R; Kitchell, J F; Hodgson, J R; Van de Bogert, M C; Bade, D L; Kritzberg, Emma LU and Bastviken, D (2004) In Nature 427(6971). p.240-243
Abstract
Ecosystems are supported by organic carbon from two distinct sources. Endogenous carbon is produced by photosynthesis within an ecosystem by autotrophic organisms. Exogenous carbon is produced elsewhere and transported into ecosystems. Consumers may use exogenous carbon with consequent influences on population dynamics, predator-prey relationships and ecosystem processes(1). For example, exogenous inputs provide resources that may enhance consumer abundance beyond levels supported by within-system primary production(2). Exogenous fluxes of organic carbon to ecosystems are often large, but this material is recalcitrant and difficult to assimilate, in contrast to endogenously produced organic matter, which is used more easily(3,4). Here we... (More)
Ecosystems are supported by organic carbon from two distinct sources. Endogenous carbon is produced by photosynthesis within an ecosystem by autotrophic organisms. Exogenous carbon is produced elsewhere and transported into ecosystems. Consumers may use exogenous carbon with consequent influences on population dynamics, predator-prey relationships and ecosystem processes(1). For example, exogenous inputs provide resources that may enhance consumer abundance beyond levels supported by within-system primary production(2). Exogenous fluxes of organic carbon to ecosystems are often large, but this material is recalcitrant and difficult to assimilate, in contrast to endogenously produced organic matter, which is used more easily(3,4). Here we show, by the experimental manipulation of dissolved inorganic C-13 in two lakes, that internal primary production is insufficient to support the food webs of these ecosystems. Additions of NaH (CO3)-C-13 enriched the C-13 content of dissolved inorganic carbon, particulate organic carbon, zooplankton and fish. Dynamics of C-13 indicate that 40-55% of particulate organic carbon and 22-50% of zooplankton carbon are derived from terrestrial sources, showing that there is significant subsidy of these ecosystems by organic carbon produced outside their boundaries. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Nature
volume
427
issue
6971
pages
240 - 243
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • pmid:14724637
  • wos:000188068100042
  • scopus:1642553411
ISSN
0028-0836
DOI
10.1038/nature02227
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
290d755e-af88-49b3-aa74-59bd0e795c2f (old id 136649)
date added to LUP
2007-06-28 15:55:35
date last changed
2017-12-10 03:43:20
@article{290d755e-af88-49b3-aa74-59bd0e795c2f,
  abstract     = {Ecosystems are supported by organic carbon from two distinct sources. Endogenous carbon is produced by photosynthesis within an ecosystem by autotrophic organisms. Exogenous carbon is produced elsewhere and transported into ecosystems. Consumers may use exogenous carbon with consequent influences on population dynamics, predator-prey relationships and ecosystem processes(1). For example, exogenous inputs provide resources that may enhance consumer abundance beyond levels supported by within-system primary production(2). Exogenous fluxes of organic carbon to ecosystems are often large, but this material is recalcitrant and difficult to assimilate, in contrast to endogenously produced organic matter, which is used more easily(3,4). Here we show, by the experimental manipulation of dissolved inorganic C-13 in two lakes, that internal primary production is insufficient to support the food webs of these ecosystems. Additions of NaH (CO3)-C-13 enriched the C-13 content of dissolved inorganic carbon, particulate organic carbon, zooplankton and fish. Dynamics of C-13 indicate that 40-55% of particulate organic carbon and 22-50% of zooplankton carbon are derived from terrestrial sources, showing that there is significant subsidy of these ecosystems by organic carbon produced outside their boundaries.},
  author       = {Pace, M L and Cole, J J and Carpenter, S R and Kitchell, J F and Hodgson, J R and Van de Bogert, M C and Bade, D L and Kritzberg, Emma and Bastviken, D},
  issn         = {0028-0836},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6971},
  pages        = {240--243},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Nature},
  title        = {Whole-lake carbon-13 additions reveal terrestrial support of aquatic food webs},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature02227},
  volume       = {427},
  year         = {2004},
}