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Shear-Driven Motion of Supported Lipid Bilayers in Microfluidic Channels.

Jönsson, Peter LU ; Beech, Jason LU ; Tegenfeldt, Jonas LU and Höök, Fredrik LU (2009) In Journal of the American Chemical Society 131(14). p.5294-5297
Abstract
In this work, we demonstrate how a lateral motion of a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) and its constituents can be created without relying on self-spreading forces. The force driving the SLB is instead a viscous shear force arising from a pressure-driven bulk flow acting on the SLB that is formed on a glass wall inside a microfluidic channel. In contrast to self-spreading bilayers, this method allows for accurate control of the bilayer motion by altering the bulk flow in the channel. Experiments showed that an egg yolk phosphatidylcholine SLB formed on a glass support moved in a rolling motion under these shear forces, with the lipids in the upper leaflet of the bilayer moving at twice the velocity of the bilayer front. The drift velocity of... (More)
In this work, we demonstrate how a lateral motion of a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) and its constituents can be created without relying on self-spreading forces. The force driving the SLB is instead a viscous shear force arising from a pressure-driven bulk flow acting on the SLB that is formed on a glass wall inside a microfluidic channel. In contrast to self-spreading bilayers, this method allows for accurate control of the bilayer motion by altering the bulk flow in the channel. Experiments showed that an egg yolk phosphatidylcholine SLB formed on a glass support moved in a rolling motion under these shear forces, with the lipids in the upper leaflet of the bilayer moving at twice the velocity of the bilayer front. The drift velocity of different lipid probes in the SLB was observed to be sensitive to the interactions between the lipid probe and the surrounding molecules, resulting in drift velocities that varied by up to 1 order of magnitude for the different lipid probes in our experiments. Since the method provides a so far unattainable control of the motion of all molecules in an SLB, we foresee great potential for this technique, alone or in combination with other methods, for studies of lipid bilayers and different membrane-associated molecules. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of the American Chemical Society
volume
131
issue
14
pages
5294 - 5297
publisher
The American Chemical Society
external identifiers
  • wos:000265039000056
  • pmid:19309139
  • scopus:67749110126
ISSN
1520-5126
DOI
10.1021/ja809987b
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
34cd9c82-6883-4f0b-9741-9a8155fc9917 (old id 1367490)
date added to LUP
2009-04-07 08:21:01
date last changed
2017-07-30 04:03:02
@article{34cd9c82-6883-4f0b-9741-9a8155fc9917,
  abstract     = {In this work, we demonstrate how a lateral motion of a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) and its constituents can be created without relying on self-spreading forces. The force driving the SLB is instead a viscous shear force arising from a pressure-driven bulk flow acting on the SLB that is formed on a glass wall inside a microfluidic channel. In contrast to self-spreading bilayers, this method allows for accurate control of the bilayer motion by altering the bulk flow in the channel. Experiments showed that an egg yolk phosphatidylcholine SLB formed on a glass support moved in a rolling motion under these shear forces, with the lipids in the upper leaflet of the bilayer moving at twice the velocity of the bilayer front. The drift velocity of different lipid probes in the SLB was observed to be sensitive to the interactions between the lipid probe and the surrounding molecules, resulting in drift velocities that varied by up to 1 order of magnitude for the different lipid probes in our experiments. Since the method provides a so far unattainable control of the motion of all molecules in an SLB, we foresee great potential for this technique, alone or in combination with other methods, for studies of lipid bilayers and different membrane-associated molecules.},
  author       = {Jönsson, Peter and Beech, Jason and Tegenfeldt, Jonas and Höök, Fredrik},
  issn         = {1520-5126},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {14},
  pages        = {5294--5297},
  publisher    = {The American Chemical Society},
  series       = {Journal of the American Chemical Society},
  title        = {Shear-Driven Motion of Supported Lipid Bilayers in Microfluidic Channels.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ja809987b},
  volume       = {131},
  year         = {2009},
}