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Male brood care without paternity increases mating success

Härdling, Roger LU and Kaitala, A J (2004) In Behavioral Ecology 15(5). p.715-721
Abstract
We investigate under which conditions we can expect the evolution of costly male care for unrelated offspring, when the benefit of such care is in the form of increased mating success. This applies to male helping behavior that cannot be explained as paternal care because the male's own offspring does not benefit from his behavior. Our model shows that caring for others' offspring can be a stable strategy for males, if a male that does not "help" loses mating opportunities, for example if females discriminate against non-helping males as mating partners. This is possible when females are polyandrous. Increasing population density decreases the parameter region where male care is stable. Male care is also more likely to be stable when male... (More)
We investigate under which conditions we can expect the evolution of costly male care for unrelated offspring, when the benefit of such care is in the form of increased mating success. This applies to male helping behavior that cannot be explained as paternal care because the male's own offspring does not benefit from his behavior. Our model shows that caring for others' offspring can be a stable strategy for males, if a male that does not "help" loses mating opportunities, for example if females discriminate against non-helping males as mating partners. This is possible when females are polyandrous. Increasing population density decreases the parameter region where male care is stable. Male care is also more likely to be stable when male mortality rate is higher than that of females. We discuss the results with special reference to the golden egg bug Phyllomorpha laciniata, where females lay eggs on conspecifics, often on males before mating. Males therefore carry mostly unrelated eggs. We investigate how oviposition rate and female mating rate influences when egg carrying is an evolutionary stable strategy. We conclude that in the golden egg bug, male egg carrying could be explained as a form of mating investment. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Behavioral Ecology
volume
15
issue
5
pages
715 - 721
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:4344647548
ISSN
1045-2249
DOI
10.1093/beheco/arh046
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
11b4118c-495b-4f4d-8636-da0b2513af2d (old id 136939)
date added to LUP
2007-06-25 13:32:43
date last changed
2017-11-05 04:28:04
@article{11b4118c-495b-4f4d-8636-da0b2513af2d,
  abstract     = {We investigate under which conditions we can expect the evolution of costly male care for unrelated offspring, when the benefit of such care is in the form of increased mating success. This applies to male helping behavior that cannot be explained as paternal care because the male's own offspring does not benefit from his behavior. Our model shows that caring for others' offspring can be a stable strategy for males, if a male that does not "help" loses mating opportunities, for example if females discriminate against non-helping males as mating partners. This is possible when females are polyandrous. Increasing population density decreases the parameter region where male care is stable. Male care is also more likely to be stable when male mortality rate is higher than that of females. We discuss the results with special reference to the golden egg bug Phyllomorpha laciniata, where females lay eggs on conspecifics, often on males before mating. Males therefore carry mostly unrelated eggs. We investigate how oviposition rate and female mating rate influences when egg carrying is an evolutionary stable strategy. We conclude that in the golden egg bug, male egg carrying could be explained as a form of mating investment.},
  author       = {Härdling, Roger and Kaitala, A J},
  issn         = {1045-2249},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {715--721},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Behavioral Ecology},
  title        = {Male brood care without paternity increases mating success},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arh046},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2004},
}