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Cardiovascular fitness in young males and risk of unprovoked venous thromboembolism in adulthood

Zöller, Bengt LU ; Ohlsson, Henrik LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2017) In Annals of Medicine 49(2). p.176-184
Abstract

Background: Whether high cardiovascular fitness is associated with reduced risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is unknown. The present study aims to determine whether high cardiovascular fitness reduces the risk of VTE. Methods: A Swedish cohort of male conscripts (n = 773,925) born in 1954–1970 with no history of previous VTE were followed from enlistment (1972–1990) until 2010. Data on cardiovascular fitness using a cycle ergonometric test (maximal aerobic workload in Watt [Wmax]) at conscription were linked with national hospital register data and the Multi-Generation Register. We identified all full-siblings and first-cousin pairs discordant for maximal aerobic workload. This co-relative design allows for adjustment for... (More)

Background: Whether high cardiovascular fitness is associated with reduced risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is unknown. The present study aims to determine whether high cardiovascular fitness reduces the risk of VTE. Methods: A Swedish cohort of male conscripts (n = 773,925) born in 1954–1970 with no history of previous VTE were followed from enlistment (1972–1990) until 2010. Data on cardiovascular fitness using a cycle ergonometric test (maximal aerobic workload in Watt [Wmax]) at conscription were linked with national hospital register data and the Multi-Generation Register. We identified all full-siblings and first-cousin pairs discordant for maximal aerobic workload. This co-relative design allows for adjustment for familial resemblance. Results: In total, 3005 (0.39%) males were affected by VTE. Cardiovascular fitness estimated with Wmax was not associated with VTE risk when adjusted for body mass index (BMI). However, cardiovascular fitness estimated with Wmax/kg and adjusted for BMI was associated with reduced risk for VTE (Hazard ratio (HR) 0.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78–0.85 per standard deviation compared with mean Wmax/kg). The association was weaker over time and also when examining discordant first cousins and full-sibling pairs. Conclusions: These results suggest that there is a relationship between cardiovascular fitness and weight that is important for future VTE risk.Key messagesWhether high cardiovascular fitness is associated with reduced risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is unknown.A Swedish cohort of male conscripts (n = 773,925) tested with a cycle ergometric test with no history of previous VTE were followed from enlistment (1972–1990) until 2010.Cardiovascular fitness estimated with Wmax/kg and adjusted for BMI was associated with reduced risk for VTE (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.78–0.85).These results suggest that there is a relationship between cardiovascular fitness and weight that is important for future VTE risk.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Epidemiology, exercise, genetics, venous thromboembolism
in
Annals of Medicine
volume
49
issue
2
pages
9 pages
publisher
Informa Healthcare
external identifiers
  • scopus:84999816120
  • wos:000392645600009
ISSN
0785-3890
DOI
10.1080/07853890.2016.1252057
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1372c31f-7df0-44f5-8be0-3a7e4c89bab1
date added to LUP
2016-12-19 08:13:08
date last changed
2018-06-10 05:13:52
@article{1372c31f-7df0-44f5-8be0-3a7e4c89bab1,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Whether high cardiovascular fitness is associated with reduced risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is unknown. The present study aims to determine whether high cardiovascular fitness reduces the risk of VTE. Methods: A Swedish cohort of male conscripts (n = 773,925) born in 1954–1970 with no history of previous VTE were followed from enlistment (1972–1990) until 2010. Data on cardiovascular fitness using a cycle ergonometric test (maximal aerobic workload in Watt [W<sub>max</sub>]) at conscription were linked with national hospital register data and the Multi-Generation Register. We identified all full-siblings and first-cousin pairs discordant for maximal aerobic workload. This co-relative design allows for adjustment for familial resemblance. Results: In total, 3005 (0.39%) males were affected by VTE. Cardiovascular fitness estimated with W<sub>max</sub> was not associated with VTE risk when adjusted for body mass index (BMI). However, cardiovascular fitness estimated with W<sub>max</sub>/kg and adjusted for BMI was associated with reduced risk for VTE (Hazard ratio (HR) 0.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78–0.85 per standard deviation compared with mean W<sub>max</sub>/kg). The association was weaker over time and also when examining discordant first cousins and full-sibling pairs. Conclusions: These results suggest that there is a relationship between cardiovascular fitness and weight that is important for future VTE risk.Key messagesWhether high cardiovascular fitness is associated with reduced risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is unknown.A Swedish cohort of male conscripts (n = 773,925) tested with a cycle ergometric test with no history of previous VTE were followed from enlistment (1972–1990) until 2010.Cardiovascular fitness estimated with W<sub>max</sub>/kg and adjusted for BMI was associated with reduced risk for VTE (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.78–0.85).These results suggest that there is a relationship between cardiovascular fitness and weight that is important for future VTE risk.</p>},
  author       = {Zöller, Bengt and Ohlsson, Henrik and Sundquist, Jan and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {0785-3890},
  keyword      = {Epidemiology,exercise,genetics,venous thromboembolism},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {176--184},
  publisher    = {Informa Healthcare},
  series       = {Annals of Medicine},
  title        = {Cardiovascular fitness in young males and risk of unprovoked venous thromboembolism in adulthood},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07853890.2016.1252057},
  volume       = {49},
  year         = {2017},
}