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Herbivore-induced responses in alfalfa (Medicago sativa)

Agrell, Jep LU ; Oleszek, W ; Stochmal, A ; Olsen, M and Anderson, P (2003) In Journal of Chemical Ecology 29(2). p.303-320
Abstract
The herbivore-induced response of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) was examined through assays with Spodoptera littoralis larvae and analyses of important secondary substances. In food preference experiments, larvae preferred young undamaged alfalfa plants over plants that had been damaged by feeding larvae 5 and 7 days earlier, while no difference in feeding preferences could be detected 1, 9, and 14 days after damage. This suggests a peak in the herbivore induced resistance of alfalfa approximately one week after initial damage. The induced resistance in young plants was also shown to be systemic, while older flowering plants failed to show increased resistance after defoliation. Larvae gained weight slower and had lower pupal mass when fed... (More)
The herbivore-induced response of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) was examined through assays with Spodoptera littoralis larvae and analyses of important secondary substances. In food preference experiments, larvae preferred young undamaged alfalfa plants over plants that had been damaged by feeding larvae 5 and 7 days earlier, while no difference in feeding preferences could be detected 1, 9, and 14 days after damage. This suggests a peak in the herbivore induced resistance of alfalfa approximately one week after initial damage. The induced resistance in young plants was also shown to be systemic, while older flowering plants failed to show increased resistance after defoliation. Larvae gained weight slower and had lower pupal mass when fed damaged alfalfa than when fed undamaged alfalfa. Levels of total saponins were increased in foliage of damaged alfalfa, and detailed analyses of specific saponin components revealed doubled concentrations of 3GlcA, 28AraRhaXyl medicagenate (medicagenic acid bidesmoside) and 3GlcAGalRha soyasapogenol B(soyasaponin I). Levels of the flavonoid apigenin (as free aglycone) also were increased in herbivore damaged plants. The herbivore-induced response of alfalfa was significantly weaker than that of cotton: S. littoralis larvae given a choice of undamaged cotton and undamaged alfalfa preferred to feed on cotton, whereas preferences shifted towards alfalfa when plants were damaged. (Less)
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author
; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Chemical Ecology
volume
29
issue
2
pages
303 - 320
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:12737260
  • wos:000181374800004
  • scopus:0242585314
ISSN
1573-1561
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Animal Ecology (Closed 2011) (011012001)
id
18998790-cf0c-4dd1-82c9-a394601e1c87 (old id 137357)
alternative location
http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1022625810395
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 16:12:16
date last changed
2021-03-24 05:30:28
@article{18998790-cf0c-4dd1-82c9-a394601e1c87,
  abstract     = {The herbivore-induced response of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) was examined through assays with Spodoptera littoralis larvae and analyses of important secondary substances. In food preference experiments, larvae preferred young undamaged alfalfa plants over plants that had been damaged by feeding larvae 5 and 7 days earlier, while no difference in feeding preferences could be detected 1, 9, and 14 days after damage. This suggests a peak in the herbivore induced resistance of alfalfa approximately one week after initial damage. The induced resistance in young plants was also shown to be systemic, while older flowering plants failed to show increased resistance after defoliation. Larvae gained weight slower and had lower pupal mass when fed damaged alfalfa than when fed undamaged alfalfa. Levels of total saponins were increased in foliage of damaged alfalfa, and detailed analyses of specific saponin components revealed doubled concentrations of 3GlcA, 28AraRhaXyl medicagenate (medicagenic acid bidesmoside) and 3GlcAGalRha soyasapogenol B(soyasaponin I). Levels of the flavonoid apigenin (as free aglycone) also were increased in herbivore damaged plants. The herbivore-induced response of alfalfa was significantly weaker than that of cotton: S. littoralis larvae given a choice of undamaged cotton and undamaged alfalfa preferred to feed on cotton, whereas preferences shifted towards alfalfa when plants were damaged.},
  author       = {Agrell, Jep and Oleszek, W and Stochmal, A and Olsen, M and Anderson, P},
  issn         = {1573-1561},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {303--320},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Journal of Chemical Ecology},
  title        = {Herbivore-induced responses in alfalfa (Medicago sativa)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1022625810395},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2003},
}