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Allozyme diversity and genetic structure of marginal and central populations of Corylus avellana L. (Betulaceae) in Europe

Persson, Helena LU ; Widén, Björn LU ; Andersson, Stefan LU and Svensson, Linus (2004) In Plant Systematics and Evolution 244(3-4). p.157-179
Abstract
Corylus avellana L. (hazel, Betulaceae) is a long-lived, widespread shrub in Europe, having its northern range margin in Fennoscandia and a postglacial history involving range-expansion from refugial areas in southern Europe. In this study, we tested for a relationship between marginality and low within-population genetic diversity by assessing patterns of variation at 14 putatively neutral allozyme loci (comprising 43 putative alleles) within and between 40 natural populations of C. avellana along a north-south transect in Europe. Geographically marginal populations (central Sweden) showed lower levels of within-population diversity than populations in more central regions, as indicated by significant negative correlations between... (More)
Corylus avellana L. (hazel, Betulaceae) is a long-lived, widespread shrub in Europe, having its northern range margin in Fennoscandia and a postglacial history involving range-expansion from refugial areas in southern Europe. In this study, we tested for a relationship between marginality and low within-population genetic diversity by assessing patterns of variation at 14 putatively neutral allozyme loci (comprising 43 putative alleles) within and between 40 natural populations of C. avellana along a north-south transect in Europe. Geographically marginal populations (central Sweden) showed lower levels of within-population diversity than populations in more central regions, as indicated by significant negative correlations between latitude and the percentage of polymorphic loci (r(S)=-0.47, P < 0.001), the average number of alleles per locus (r(S)=-0.65, P < 0.001), the expected heterozygosity (r(S)=-0.19, P < 0.05), and the proportion of distinguishable genotypes (r(S)=-0.56, P < 0.001). These patterns, combined with the unusually high between-population component of gene diversity (G(ST)=19.7%) and allelic richness (A(ST)=24%) in the marginal region, can be attributed to historical bottlenecks during the species' postglacial range-expansion, but may also reflect a history of genetic drift in the small, isolated populations occupying the marginal region. Information on the spatial distribution of genotypes provide further support for a role of vegetative reproduction (layering) in the structuring of genetic variation within populations. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Plant Systematics and Evolution
volume
244
issue
3-4
pages
157 - 179
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000220097500003
  • scopus:1842524025
ISSN
1615-6110
DOI
10.1007/s00606-003-0073-3
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ca847ad8-ee76-4524-bdd4-d6d529c93a59 (old id 137514)
date added to LUP
2007-07-02 13:30:26
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:57:18
@article{ca847ad8-ee76-4524-bdd4-d6d529c93a59,
  abstract     = {Corylus avellana L. (hazel, Betulaceae) is a long-lived, widespread shrub in Europe, having its northern range margin in Fennoscandia and a postglacial history involving range-expansion from refugial areas in southern Europe. In this study, we tested for a relationship between marginality and low within-population genetic diversity by assessing patterns of variation at 14 putatively neutral allozyme loci (comprising 43 putative alleles) within and between 40 natural populations of C. avellana along a north-south transect in Europe. Geographically marginal populations (central Sweden) showed lower levels of within-population diversity than populations in more central regions, as indicated by significant negative correlations between latitude and the percentage of polymorphic loci (r(S)=-0.47, P &lt; 0.001), the average number of alleles per locus (r(S)=-0.65, P &lt; 0.001), the expected heterozygosity (r(S)=-0.19, P &lt; 0.05), and the proportion of distinguishable genotypes (r(S)=-0.56, P &lt; 0.001). These patterns, combined with the unusually high between-population component of gene diversity (G(ST)=19.7%) and allelic richness (A(ST)=24%) in the marginal region, can be attributed to historical bottlenecks during the species' postglacial range-expansion, but may also reflect a history of genetic drift in the small, isolated populations occupying the marginal region. Information on the spatial distribution of genotypes provide further support for a role of vegetative reproduction (layering) in the structuring of genetic variation within populations.},
  author       = {Persson, Helena and Widén, Björn and Andersson, Stefan and Svensson, Linus},
  issn         = {1615-6110},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3-4},
  pages        = {157--179},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Plant Systematics and Evolution},
  title        = {Allozyme diversity and genetic structure of marginal and central populations of Corylus avellana L. (Betulaceae) in Europe},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00606-003-0073-3},
  volume       = {244},
  year         = {2004},
}