Advanced

Computers, Nanotechnology and Mind

Ekdahl, Bertil LU (2008) 8th International Conference on Computing Anticipatory Systems (CASYS 07) In Computing Anticipatory Systems 1051. p.283-292
Abstract
In 1958, two years after the Dartmouth conference, where the term artificial intelligence was coined, Herbert Simon and Allen Newell asserted the existence of "machines that think, that learn and create". They were further prophesying that the machines' capacity would increase and be oil par with the human mind. Now, 50 years later, computers perform many more tasks than one could imagine in the 1950s but, virtually, no computer can do more than could the first digital computer, developed by John von Neumann in the 1940s. Computers still follow algorithms, they do not create them. However, the development of nanotechnology seems to have given rise to new hopes. With nanotechnology two things are Supposed to happen. Firstly, due to the... (More)
In 1958, two years after the Dartmouth conference, where the term artificial intelligence was coined, Herbert Simon and Allen Newell asserted the existence of "machines that think, that learn and create". They were further prophesying that the machines' capacity would increase and be oil par with the human mind. Now, 50 years later, computers perform many more tasks than one could imagine in the 1950s but, virtually, no computer can do more than could the first digital computer, developed by John von Neumann in the 1940s. Computers still follow algorithms, they do not create them. However, the development of nanotechnology seems to have given rise to new hopes. With nanotechnology two things are Supposed to happen. Firstly, due to the small scale it will be possible to construct huge Computer memories which are supposed to be the precondition for building an artificial brain, secondly, nanotechnology will make it possible to scan the brain which in turn will make reverse engineering possible: the mind will be decoded by studying the brain. The consequence of such a belief is that the brain is no more than a calculator, i.e., all that the mind can do is in principle the results of arithmetical operations. Computers are equivalent to formal systems which in turn was an answer to an idea by Hilbert that proofs should contain ideal statements for which operations cannot be applied in a contentual way. The advocates of artificial intelligence will place content in a machine that is developed not only to be free of content but also cannot contain content. In this paper I argue that the hope for artificial intelligence is in vain (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Artificial intelligence, linguistic complementarity, mechanical system, Turing machine, semantics, formal system
in
Computing Anticipatory Systems
volume
1051
pages
283 - 292
publisher
American Institute of Physics
conference name
8th International Conference on Computing Anticipatory Systems (CASYS 07)
external identifiers
  • wos:000262094700025
  • scopus:57049091525
ISSN
0094-243X
1551-7616
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9aa97cc0-1c94-4654-a999-77ab1bf6f650 (old id 1376266)
date added to LUP
2009-04-17 09:22:46
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:33:50
@inproceedings{9aa97cc0-1c94-4654-a999-77ab1bf6f650,
  abstract     = {In 1958, two years after the Dartmouth conference, where the term artificial intelligence was coined, Herbert Simon and Allen Newell asserted the existence of "machines that think, that learn and create". They were further prophesying that the machines' capacity would increase and be oil par with the human mind. Now, 50 years later, computers perform many more tasks than one could imagine in the 1950s but, virtually, no computer can do more than could the first digital computer, developed by John von Neumann in the 1940s. Computers still follow algorithms, they do not create them. However, the development of nanotechnology seems to have given rise to new hopes. With nanotechnology two things are Supposed to happen. Firstly, due to the small scale it will be possible to construct huge Computer memories which are supposed to be the precondition for building an artificial brain, secondly, nanotechnology will make it possible to scan the brain which in turn will make reverse engineering possible: the mind will be decoded by studying the brain. The consequence of such a belief is that the brain is no more than a calculator, i.e., all that the mind can do is in principle the results of arithmetical operations. Computers are equivalent to formal systems which in turn was an answer to an idea by Hilbert that proofs should contain ideal statements for which operations cannot be applied in a contentual way. The advocates of artificial intelligence will place content in a machine that is developed not only to be free of content but also cannot contain content. In this paper I argue that the hope for artificial intelligence is in vain},
  author       = {Ekdahl, Bertil},
  booktitle    = {Computing Anticipatory Systems},
  issn         = {0094-243X},
  keyword      = {Artificial intelligence,linguistic complementarity,mechanical system,Turing machine,semantics,formal system},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {283--292},
  publisher    = {American Institute of Physics},
  title        = {Computers, Nanotechnology and Mind},
  volume       = {1051},
  year         = {2008},
}