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Use of a gradient of N-deposition to calculate effect-related soil and vegetation measures in deciduous forests

Falkengren-Grerup, Ursula LU and Diekmann, M (2003) In Forest Ecology and Management 180(1-3). p.113-124
Abstract
Deposition of N and S has increased since the 1950s in most European countries and N accumulates in ecosystems that are not N saturated. This study shows long-term effects of a (modelled) N deposition of 7-17 kg N ha(-1) per year on biological and chemical processes in soil, vegetation composition, and functional types of field-layer plant species in deciduous forests. Soil pH largely determined the response of the soil processes, emphasising the importance to compare soils of similar acidity regarding the effects of N deposition. The most pronounced effects were demonstrated for the most acid study plots. When we compared regions with a deposition of 7 and 17 kg N ha(-1) per year we found a 40-80% higher soil N mineralisation rate, 2-90%... (More)
Deposition of N and S has increased since the 1950s in most European countries and N accumulates in ecosystems that are not N saturated. This study shows long-term effects of a (modelled) N deposition of 7-17 kg N ha(-1) per year on biological and chemical processes in soil, vegetation composition, and functional types of field-layer plant species in deciduous forests. Soil pH largely determined the response of the soil processes, emphasising the importance to compare soils of similar acidity regarding the effects of N deposition. The most pronounced effects were demonstrated for the most acid study plots. When we compared regions with a deposition of 7 and 17 kg N ha(-1) per year we found a 40-80% higher soil N mineralisation rate, 2-90% higher nitrification rate and 10-25% lower C:N ratio in the region with the highest deposition. Similar but smaller differences were indicated when regions with a deposition of 7 and 10 kg N ha(-1) per year were compared. Number of species was lower in the regions with the highest deposition. Literature data for plants on N concentration, nitrate reductase activity (NRA), growth rates, morphology and height were calculated on a site basis. They varied to different extent between the regions. The N concentration was 7-24% higher in the regions with the highest N deposition. We argue that the effect-related critical load based on our results should be set to a N deposition of 7-10 kg N ha(-1) per year. Critical loads for a subdivision of deciduous forests would give lower critical loads for the most acid soils compared to less acid soil. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Forest Ecology and Management
volume
180
issue
1-3
pages
113 - 124
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000184311800010
  • scopus:0037931470
ISSN
1872-7042
DOI
10.1016/S0378-1127(02)00605-9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
39b016c7-298c-4476-a64a-171a5db5593f (old id 137637)
date added to LUP
2007-07-02 09:45:18
date last changed
2018-10-03 11:42:04
@article{39b016c7-298c-4476-a64a-171a5db5593f,
  abstract     = {Deposition of N and S has increased since the 1950s in most European countries and N accumulates in ecosystems that are not N saturated. This study shows long-term effects of a (modelled) N deposition of 7-17 kg N ha(-1) per year on biological and chemical processes in soil, vegetation composition, and functional types of field-layer plant species in deciduous forests. Soil pH largely determined the response of the soil processes, emphasising the importance to compare soils of similar acidity regarding the effects of N deposition. The most pronounced effects were demonstrated for the most acid study plots. When we compared regions with a deposition of 7 and 17 kg N ha(-1) per year we found a 40-80% higher soil N mineralisation rate, 2-90% higher nitrification rate and 10-25% lower C:N ratio in the region with the highest deposition. Similar but smaller differences were indicated when regions with a deposition of 7 and 10 kg N ha(-1) per year were compared. Number of species was lower in the regions with the highest deposition. Literature data for plants on N concentration, nitrate reductase activity (NRA), growth rates, morphology and height were calculated on a site basis. They varied to different extent between the regions. The N concentration was 7-24% higher in the regions with the highest N deposition. We argue that the effect-related critical load based on our results should be set to a N deposition of 7-10 kg N ha(-1) per year. Critical loads for a subdivision of deciduous forests would give lower critical loads for the most acid soils compared to less acid soil.},
  author       = {Falkengren-Grerup, Ursula and Diekmann, M},
  issn         = {1872-7042},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-3},
  pages        = {113--124},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Forest Ecology and Management},
  title        = {Use of a gradient of N-deposition to calculate effect-related soil and vegetation measures in deciduous forests},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0378-1127(02)00605-9},
  volume       = {180},
  year         = {2003},
}