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Large-scale geographic patterns of genetic variation in Melica nutans, a widespread Eurasian woodland grass

Tyler, Torbjörn LU (2002) In Plant Systematics and Evolution 236(1-2). p.73-87
Abstract
The geographic distribution of allozyme variation within the Eurasian boreo-nemoreal woodland grass Melica nutans L. has been investigated together with a minor subset of other Melica species. Twenty alleles were found at nine polymorphic loci in M. nutans. Allelic richness was highest in areas central in the species' European distribution, i.e. in southern Fennoscandia. High population densities, reducing the effects of genetic drift, as well as accumulation of variation through long-distance gene-flow from different marginal populations, is proposed to explain high allelic richness in this area. Several alleles showed geographic patterns in distribution and frequency variation. However, these patterns were not congruent, e.g. some... (More)
The geographic distribution of allozyme variation within the Eurasian boreo-nemoreal woodland grass Melica nutans L. has been investigated together with a minor subset of other Melica species. Twenty alleles were found at nine polymorphic loci in M. nutans. Allelic richness was highest in areas central in the species' European distribution, i.e. in southern Fennoscandia. High population densities, reducing the effects of genetic drift, as well as accumulation of variation through long-distance gene-flow from different marginal populations, is proposed to explain high allelic richness in this area. Several alleles showed geographic patterns in distribution and frequency variation. However, these patterns were not congruent, e.g. some alleles appear to have migrated to northern Europe from the south-west whereas others may have spread from the east. Genetic distances between geographic regions, each consisting of 2-6 populations, were generally low between all Fennoscandian, Russian and Siberian regions, but much higher between western and continental European regions. On the population level, cluster analysis grouped populations from Siberia, Russia, coastal and lowland areas in Fennoscandia and British Cumbria into one subcluster whereas other subclusters contained mainly south-west European populations or populations from almost throughout the distribution range. A scenario with several independent glacial refugia in central Europe, south-western Siberia and possibly western Norway, and subsequent colonisation of Fennoscandia mainly from the east, but with some long-distance gene-flow from central Europe, is proposed. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Plant Systematics and Evolution
volume
236
issue
1-2
pages
73 - 87
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000180234400006
  • scopus:0036927298
ISSN
1615-6110
DOI
10.1007/s00606-002-0235-8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6586ef54-b5d5-49a6-85fe-0859e8d24dcd (old id 137706)
date added to LUP
2007-07-02 15:33:53
date last changed
2017-07-02 03:42:33
@article{6586ef54-b5d5-49a6-85fe-0859e8d24dcd,
  abstract     = {The geographic distribution of allozyme variation within the Eurasian boreo-nemoreal woodland grass Melica nutans L. has been investigated together with a minor subset of other Melica species. Twenty alleles were found at nine polymorphic loci in M. nutans. Allelic richness was highest in areas central in the species' European distribution, i.e. in southern Fennoscandia. High population densities, reducing the effects of genetic drift, as well as accumulation of variation through long-distance gene-flow from different marginal populations, is proposed to explain high allelic richness in this area. Several alleles showed geographic patterns in distribution and frequency variation. However, these patterns were not congruent, e.g. some alleles appear to have migrated to northern Europe from the south-west whereas others may have spread from the east. Genetic distances between geographic regions, each consisting of 2-6 populations, were generally low between all Fennoscandian, Russian and Siberian regions, but much higher between western and continental European regions. On the population level, cluster analysis grouped populations from Siberia, Russia, coastal and lowland areas in Fennoscandia and British Cumbria into one subcluster whereas other subclusters contained mainly south-west European populations or populations from almost throughout the distribution range. A scenario with several independent glacial refugia in central Europe, south-western Siberia and possibly western Norway, and subsequent colonisation of Fennoscandia mainly from the east, but with some long-distance gene-flow from central Europe, is proposed.},
  author       = {Tyler, Torbjörn},
  issn         = {1615-6110},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {73--87},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Plant Systematics and Evolution},
  title        = {Large-scale geographic patterns of genetic variation in Melica nutans, a widespread Eurasian woodland grass},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00606-002-0235-8},
  volume       = {236},
  year         = {2002},
}