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Geographic structure of genetic variation in the widespread woodland grass Milium effusum L. A comparison between two regions with contrasting history and geomorphology

Tyler, Torbjörn LU (2002) In Genome 45(6). p.1248-1256
Abstract
Allozyme variation in the forest grass Milium effusum L. was studied in 21-23 populations within each of two equally sized densely sampled areas in northern and southern Sweden. In addition, 25 populations from other parts of Eurasia were studied for comparison. The structure of variation was analysed with both diversity statistics and measures based on allelic richness at a standardised sample size. The species was found to be highly variable, but no clear geographic patterns in the distribution of alleles or in overall genetic differentiation were found, either within the two regions or within the whole sample. Thus, no inferences about the direction of postglacial migration could be made. Obviously, migration and gene flow must have... (More)
Allozyme variation in the forest grass Milium effusum L. was studied in 21-23 populations within each of two equally sized densely sampled areas in northern and southern Sweden. In addition, 25 populations from other parts of Eurasia were studied for comparison. The structure of variation was analysed with both diversity statistics and measures based on allelic richness at a standardised sample size. The species was found to be highly variable, but no clear geographic patterns in the distribution of alleles or in overall genetic differentiation were found, either within the two regions or within the whole sample. Thus, no inferences about the direction of postglacial migration could be made. Obviously, migration and gene flow must have taken place in a manner capable of randomising the distribution of alleles. However, there were clear differences in levels and structuring of the variation between the two regions. Levels of variation, both in terms of genetic diversity and allelic richness, were lower in northern Sweden as compared with southern Sweden. In contrast, different measures of geographic structure all showed higher levels of population differentiation in the northern region. This is interpreted as due to different geomorphological conditions in the two regions, creating a relatively continuous habitat and gene flow in the southern region as compared with the northern region where the species, although common, is confined to narrow and mutually isolated corridors in the landscape. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
allelic richness, allozymes, geographic differentiation, Milium effusum, population fragmentation
in
Genome
volume
45
issue
6
pages
1248 - 1256
publisher
NRC Research Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:12502271
  • wos:000179862100029
  • scopus:1842854779
ISSN
0831-2796
DOI
10.1139/g02-079
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ab804292-d874-4827-a661-64ba132dd979 (old id 137714)
date added to LUP
2007-07-02 15:35:05
date last changed
2017-04-30 06:44:32
@article{ab804292-d874-4827-a661-64ba132dd979,
  abstract     = {Allozyme variation in the forest grass Milium effusum L. was studied in 21-23 populations within each of two equally sized densely sampled areas in northern and southern Sweden. In addition, 25 populations from other parts of Eurasia were studied for comparison. The structure of variation was analysed with both diversity statistics and measures based on allelic richness at a standardised sample size. The species was found to be highly variable, but no clear geographic patterns in the distribution of alleles or in overall genetic differentiation were found, either within the two regions or within the whole sample. Thus, no inferences about the direction of postglacial migration could be made. Obviously, migration and gene flow must have taken place in a manner capable of randomising the distribution of alleles. However, there were clear differences in levels and structuring of the variation between the two regions. Levels of variation, both in terms of genetic diversity and allelic richness, were lower in northern Sweden as compared with southern Sweden. In contrast, different measures of geographic structure all showed higher levels of population differentiation in the northern region. This is interpreted as due to different geomorphological conditions in the two regions, creating a relatively continuous habitat and gene flow in the southern region as compared with the northern region where the species, although common, is confined to narrow and mutually isolated corridors in the landscape.},
  author       = {Tyler, Torbjörn},
  issn         = {0831-2796},
  keyword      = {allelic richness,allozymes,geographic differentiation,Milium effusum,population fragmentation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1248--1256},
  publisher    = {NRC Research Press},
  series       = {Genome},
  title        = {Geographic structure of genetic variation in the widespread woodland grass Milium effusum L. A comparison between two regions with contrasting history and geomorphology},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/g02-079},
  volume       = {45},
  year         = {2002},
}