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Regionalized nitrogen budgets in forest soils for different deposition and forestry scenarios in Sweden

Akselsson, Cecilia LU and Westling, Olle (2005) In Global Ecology and Biogeography Letters 14(1). p.85-95
Abstract
Aim The aim of this work was to estimate on a regional scale the effects of nitrogen (N) deposition and harvest intensity on N-budgets in forest soils as a basis for strategies of emission reduction and sustainable forest management methods. Location The calculations were applied to Sweden, a country with a managed forest area of 23 x 10(6) ha. Methods Mass balance calculations, including N-deposition, N-fixation, N-loss through harvest, and N-leaching, were performed on a GIS platform using 5 x 5 km grids. Modelled deposition data together with spatial data obtained from the National Forest Inventory served as the basis for the calculations. Four different scenarios were run: a 'base scenario' involving present deposition and conventional... (More)
Aim The aim of this work was to estimate on a regional scale the effects of nitrogen (N) deposition and harvest intensity on N-budgets in forest soils as a basis for strategies of emission reduction and sustainable forest management methods. Location The calculations were applied to Sweden, a country with a managed forest area of 23 x 10(6) ha. Methods Mass balance calculations, including N-deposition, N-fixation, N-loss through harvest, and N-leaching, were performed on a GIS platform using 5 x 5 km grids. Modelled deposition data together with spatial data obtained from the National Forest Inventory served as the basis for the calculations. Four different scenarios were run: a 'base scenario' involving present deposition and conventional forestry (stem harvest only); a 'whole-tree harvesting scenario' with present deposition and the harvesting of stems, branches and needles; a 'decreased deposition scenario'; and a 'whole-tree harvesting and decreased deposition scenario'. Results There was a sharp N-accumulation gradient with an increase in accumulation in the direction of the south-western part of Sweden. In the 'base scenario', N-accumulation appeared in the country as a whole, apart from certain small areas in the northern part. Whole-tree harvesting led to net losses in extensive areas located mainly in northern and central Sweden. In most parts of the country, whole-tree harvesting combined with decreased deposition was found to result in net losses. Main conclusions The intensity of the forestry has a strong impact on the N-budget. Conventional forestry in combination with the present deposition level results in a high net accumulation of N in the south-western parts of Sweden and accordingly, in a risk of unwanted environmental effects such as increased N-leaching. With whole-tree harvesting, the N-balance is negative in parts of Sweden, mainly in the northern and central parts. N-fertilization may become necessary there if the present level of forest production is to be maintained. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Global Ecology and Biogeography Letters
volume
14
issue
1
pages
85 - 95
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000226395400008
  • scopus:12444282734
ISSN
0960-7447
DOI
10.1111/j.1466-822X.2004.00137.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
94c0b776-64ba-449f-a920-64382df4f92e (old id 138752)
date added to LUP
2007-06-25 09:33:56
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:31:17
@article{94c0b776-64ba-449f-a920-64382df4f92e,
  abstract     = {Aim The aim of this work was to estimate on a regional scale the effects of nitrogen (N) deposition and harvest intensity on N-budgets in forest soils as a basis for strategies of emission reduction and sustainable forest management methods. Location The calculations were applied to Sweden, a country with a managed forest area of 23 x 10(6) ha. Methods Mass balance calculations, including N-deposition, N-fixation, N-loss through harvest, and N-leaching, were performed on a GIS platform using 5 x 5 km grids. Modelled deposition data together with spatial data obtained from the National Forest Inventory served as the basis for the calculations. Four different scenarios were run: a 'base scenario' involving present deposition and conventional forestry (stem harvest only); a 'whole-tree harvesting scenario' with present deposition and the harvesting of stems, branches and needles; a 'decreased deposition scenario'; and a 'whole-tree harvesting and decreased deposition scenario'. Results There was a sharp N-accumulation gradient with an increase in accumulation in the direction of the south-western part of Sweden. In the 'base scenario', N-accumulation appeared in the country as a whole, apart from certain small areas in the northern part. Whole-tree harvesting led to net losses in extensive areas located mainly in northern and central Sweden. In most parts of the country, whole-tree harvesting combined with decreased deposition was found to result in net losses. Main conclusions The intensity of the forestry has a strong impact on the N-budget. Conventional forestry in combination with the present deposition level results in a high net accumulation of N in the south-western parts of Sweden and accordingly, in a risk of unwanted environmental effects such as increased N-leaching. With whole-tree harvesting, the N-balance is negative in parts of Sweden, mainly in the northern and central parts. N-fertilization may become necessary there if the present level of forest production is to be maintained.},
  author       = {Akselsson, Cecilia and Westling, Olle},
  issn         = {0960-7447},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {85--95},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Global Ecology and Biogeography Letters},
  title        = {Regionalized nitrogen budgets in forest soils for different deposition and forestry scenarios in Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1466-822X.2004.00137.x},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2005},
}