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Reduced cerebrospinal fluid BACE1 activity in multiple sclerosis

Mattsson, N.; Axelsson, M.; Haghighi, S.; Malmestrom, C.; Wu, G.; Anckarsater, R.; Sankaranarayanan, S.; Andreasson, U.; Fredrikson, S. and Gundersen, A., et al. (2009) In Multiple Sclerosis 15(4). p.448-454
Abstract
Background Cell and animal experiments have shown that beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) may be involved in myelination. Objective Here, we assess the association of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) BACE1 activity with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods BACE1 activity and levels of secreted amyloid precursor protein (APP) and amyloid-beta (A beta) isoforms were analyzed in CSF from 100 patients with MS and 114 neurologically healthy controls. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 26 with and 41 without cerebral engagement, were also included to enable comparisons with regards to another autoimmune disease. A subset of patients with MS and controls underwent a second lumbar puncture after 10 years. Results MS patients had lower CSF... (More)
Background Cell and animal experiments have shown that beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) may be involved in myelination. Objective Here, we assess the association of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) BACE1 activity with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods BACE1 activity and levels of secreted amyloid precursor protein (APP) and amyloid-beta (A beta) isoforms were analyzed in CSF from 100 patients with MS and 114 neurologically healthy controls. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 26 with and 41 without cerebral engagement, were also included to enable comparisons with regards to another autoimmune disease. A subset of patients with MS and controls underwent a second lumbar puncture after 10 years. Results MS patients had lower CSF BACE1 activity than controls (P = 0.03) and patients with cerebral SLE (P < 0.001). Patients with cerebral SLE had higher BACE1 activity than any other group (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). BACE1 activity correlated with the different amyloid markers in all study groups. BACE1 activity decreased over 10 years in the MS group (P = 0.039) and correlated weakly with clinical disease severity scores in an inverse manner. Conclusions These results suggest an involvement of BACE1 in the MS disease process. Multiple Sclerosis 2009; 15: 448-454. http://msj.sagepub.com (Less)
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
neuroinflammation, myelination, multiple sclerosis, BACE1, cerebrospinal fluid, systemic lupus erythematosus
in
Multiple Sclerosis
volume
15
issue
4
pages
448 - 454
publisher
Arnold, Hodder Headline PLC
external identifiers
  • wos:000264569700008
  • scopus:63449105260
ISSN
1477-0970
DOI
10.1177/1352458508100031
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ae39f7b1-9add-4806-a009-2ee1dc393616 (old id 1401424)
date added to LUP
2009-06-15 11:12:31
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:24:48
@article{ae39f7b1-9add-4806-a009-2ee1dc393616,
  abstract     = {Background Cell and animal experiments have shown that beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) may be involved in myelination. Objective Here, we assess the association of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) BACE1 activity with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods BACE1 activity and levels of secreted amyloid precursor protein (APP) and amyloid-beta (A beta) isoforms were analyzed in CSF from 100 patients with MS and 114 neurologically healthy controls. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 26 with and 41 without cerebral engagement, were also included to enable comparisons with regards to another autoimmune disease. A subset of patients with MS and controls underwent a second lumbar puncture after 10 years. Results MS patients had lower CSF BACE1 activity than controls (P = 0.03) and patients with cerebral SLE (P &lt; 0.001). Patients with cerebral SLE had higher BACE1 activity than any other group (P &lt; 0.05 for all comparisons). BACE1 activity correlated with the different amyloid markers in all study groups. BACE1 activity decreased over 10 years in the MS group (P = 0.039) and correlated weakly with clinical disease severity scores in an inverse manner. Conclusions These results suggest an involvement of BACE1 in the MS disease process. Multiple Sclerosis 2009; 15: 448-454. http://msj.sagepub.com},
  author       = {Mattsson, N. and Axelsson, M. and Haghighi, S. and Malmestrom, C. and Wu, G. and Anckarsater, R. and Sankaranarayanan, S. and Andreasson, U. and Fredrikson, S. and Gundersen, A. and Johnsen, L. and Fladby, T. and Tarkowski, A. and Trysberg, E. and Wallin, A. and Anckarsäter, Henrik and Lycke, J. and Andersen, O. and Simon, A. J. and Blennow, K. and Zetterberg, H.},
  issn         = {1477-0970},
  keyword      = {neuroinflammation,myelination,multiple sclerosis,BACE1,cerebrospinal fluid,systemic lupus erythematosus},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {448--454},
  publisher    = {Arnold, Hodder Headline PLC},
  series       = {Multiple Sclerosis},
  title        = {Reduced cerebrospinal fluid BACE1 activity in multiple sclerosis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1352458508100031},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2009},
}