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DNA-lipid systems. An amphiphile self-assembly and polymer-surfactant perspective

Lindman, Björn LU ; Mel'nikov, S; Mel'nikova, Y; Nylander, Tommy LU ; Eskilsson, K; Miguel, M; Dias, R and Leal, C (2002) Conference on Lipid and Polymer-Lipid Systems, 2002 In Lipid and Polymer-Lipid Systems 120. p.52-63
Abstract
The interaction between DNA and oppositely charged surfactants has been investigated by several techniques, like fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, phase diagram determination, and ellipsometry. The phase behaviour is more strongly associative than that in previously studied systems. A precipitate is formed for very low amounts of surfactant and DNA. DNA compaction is a general phenomenon in the presence of multivalent ions and positively charged surfaces; because of the high charge density there are strong attractive ion correlation effects. The interaction between DNA and catanionic mixtures (i.e., mixtures of cationic and anionic surfactants) was also investigated. We observed that DNA compacts and adsorbs onto the surface of... (More)
The interaction between DNA and oppositely charged surfactants has been investigated by several techniques, like fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, phase diagram determination, and ellipsometry. The phase behaviour is more strongly associative than that in previously studied systems. A precipitate is formed for very low amounts of surfactant and DNA. DNA compaction is a general phenomenon in the presence of multivalent ions and positively charged surfaces; because of the high charge density there are strong attractive ion correlation effects. The interaction between DNA and catanionic mixtures (i.e., mixtures of cationic and anionic surfactants) was also investigated. We observed that DNA compacts and adsorbs onto the surface of positively charged vesicles and that the addition of anionic surfactant can release free DNA back into solution from a compact globular complex between DNA and cationic surfactant. Finally, we investigated DNA interactions with polycations, chitosans with different chain lengths, by fluorescence microscopy, in vivo transfections assays and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. The general conclusion is that a chitosan effective in promoting compaction is also efficient in transfection. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
phase, chitosan, catanionic mixtures, DNA, cationic surfactants, behaviour
in
Lipid and Polymer-Lipid Systems
volume
120
pages
52 - 63
publisher
Springer
conference name
Conference on Lipid and Polymer-Lipid Systems, 2002
external identifiers
  • wos:000177564900008
  • scopus:0036954377
ISSN
0340-255X
ISBN
978-3-540-43001-8
DOI
10.1007/3-540-45291-5_8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
13bc757e-8307-43c5-adb7-73a02f4961d1 (old id 1407220)
date added to LUP
2009-06-02 16:20:10
date last changed
2017-09-10 04:31:53
@inproceedings{13bc757e-8307-43c5-adb7-73a02f4961d1,
  abstract     = {The interaction between DNA and oppositely charged surfactants has been investigated by several techniques, like fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, phase diagram determination, and ellipsometry. The phase behaviour is more strongly associative than that in previously studied systems. A precipitate is formed for very low amounts of surfactant and DNA. DNA compaction is a general phenomenon in the presence of multivalent ions and positively charged surfaces; because of the high charge density there are strong attractive ion correlation effects. The interaction between DNA and catanionic mixtures (i.e., mixtures of cationic and anionic surfactants) was also investigated. We observed that DNA compacts and adsorbs onto the surface of positively charged vesicles and that the addition of anionic surfactant can release free DNA back into solution from a compact globular complex between DNA and cationic surfactant. Finally, we investigated DNA interactions with polycations, chitosans with different chain lengths, by fluorescence microscopy, in vivo transfections assays and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. The general conclusion is that a chitosan effective in promoting compaction is also efficient in transfection.},
  author       = {Lindman, Björn and Mel'nikov, S and Mel'nikova, Y and Nylander, Tommy and Eskilsson, K and Miguel, M and Dias, R and Leal, C},
  booktitle    = {Lipid and Polymer-Lipid Systems},
  isbn         = {978-3-540-43001-8},
  issn         = {0340-255X},
  keyword      = {phase,chitosan,catanionic mixtures,DNA,cationic surfactants,behaviour},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {52--63},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  title        = {DNA-lipid systems. An amphiphile self-assembly and polymer-surfactant perspective},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/3-540-45291-5_8},
  volume       = {120},
  year         = {2002},
}