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Genetic, morphological, and feather isotope variation of migratory willow warblers show gradual divergence in a ring.

Bensch, Staffan LU ; Grahn, Mats LU ; Müller, Nils LU ; Gay, Laurene and Åkesson, Susanne LU (2009) In Molecular Ecology 18. p.3087-3096
Abstract
Abstract The circular distribution of the willow warbler Phylloscopus trochilus around the Baltic Sea shares many features with the classic examples of ring species; however, the system is much younger. It has previously been shown that a secondary contact zone is located in central Scandinavia, where there are narrow clines for several morphological traits coincident with a migratory divide. Here we analyse multiple traits and genes from > 1700 males captured on breeding territories at 77 sites spread around the Baltic Sea to test the following hypothesis. If the secondary contact zone in Scandinavia is a result of divergence in two allopatric refuge populations during the last glaciation, we expect to find a similar secondary contact... (More)
Abstract The circular distribution of the willow warbler Phylloscopus trochilus around the Baltic Sea shares many features with the classic examples of ring species; however, the system is much younger. It has previously been shown that a secondary contact zone is located in central Scandinavia, where there are narrow clines for several morphological traits coincident with a migratory divide. Here we analyse multiple traits and genes from > 1700 males captured on breeding territories at 77 sites spread around the Baltic Sea to test the following hypothesis. If the secondary contact zone in Scandinavia is a result of divergence in two allopatric refuge populations during the last glaciation, we expect to find a similar secondary contact zone somewhere else around the circular distribution. Our results show that the trait clines were wider and displaced from each other along the eastern side of the Baltic Sea. Analyses of 12 microsatellite loci confirmed that the genome is very similar between the terminal forms (F(ST) = 0). Two AFLP-derived markers filtered out from a genomic scan instead appear to be maintained by selection. These markers exhibited steep clines at the secondary contact zone in Scandinavia, but as for the phenotypic traits, had vastly different cline centres east of the Baltic Sea. The trait clines along the ring distribution outside the Scandinavian secondary contact zone thus seem to have been shaped by independent action of selection or drift during the process of postglacial colonization. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Molecular Ecology
volume
18
pages
3087 - 3096
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000267540100016
  • scopus:67649644209
ISSN
0962-1083
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-294X.2009.04210.x
project
Migratory genes in willow warblers
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
129bee31-0f98-49e7-ae73-254a938f5abe (old id 1412099)
date added to LUP
2009-06-11 08:36:24
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:22:54
@article{129bee31-0f98-49e7-ae73-254a938f5abe,
  abstract     = {Abstract The circular distribution of the willow warbler Phylloscopus trochilus around the Baltic Sea shares many features with the classic examples of ring species; however, the system is much younger. It has previously been shown that a secondary contact zone is located in central Scandinavia, where there are narrow clines for several morphological traits coincident with a migratory divide. Here we analyse multiple traits and genes from > 1700 males captured on breeding territories at 77 sites spread around the Baltic Sea to test the following hypothesis. If the secondary contact zone in Scandinavia is a result of divergence in two allopatric refuge populations during the last glaciation, we expect to find a similar secondary contact zone somewhere else around the circular distribution. Our results show that the trait clines were wider and displaced from each other along the eastern side of the Baltic Sea. Analyses of 12 microsatellite loci confirmed that the genome is very similar between the terminal forms (F(ST) = 0). Two AFLP-derived markers filtered out from a genomic scan instead appear to be maintained by selection. These markers exhibited steep clines at the secondary contact zone in Scandinavia, but as for the phenotypic traits, had vastly different cline centres east of the Baltic Sea. The trait clines along the ring distribution outside the Scandinavian secondary contact zone thus seem to have been shaped by independent action of selection or drift during the process of postglacial colonization.},
  author       = {Bensch, Staffan and Grahn, Mats and Müller, Nils and Gay, Laurene and Åkesson, Susanne},
  issn         = {0962-1083},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {3087--3096},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Molecular Ecology},
  title        = {Genetic, morphological, and feather isotope variation of migratory willow warblers show gradual divergence in a ring.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2009.04210.x},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2009},
}