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Stress hormone dynamics: an adaptation to migration?

Nilsson, Anna LU and Sandell, Maria LU (2009) In Biology letters 5. p.480-483
Abstract
The hormone corticosterone (CORT) is an important component of a bird's response to environmental stress, but it can also have negative effects. Therefore, birds on migration are hypothesized to have repressed stress responses (migration-modulation hypothesis). In contrast to earlier studies on long-distance migrants, we evaluate this hypothesis in a population containing both migratory and resident individuals. We use a population of partially migratory blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) in southern Sweden as a model species. Migrants had higher CORT levels at the time of capture than residents, indicating migratory preparations, adaptation to stressors, higher allostatic load or possibly low social status. Migrants and residents had the... (More)
The hormone corticosterone (CORT) is an important component of a bird's response to environmental stress, but it can also have negative effects. Therefore, birds on migration are hypothesized to have repressed stress responses (migration-modulation hypothesis). In contrast to earlier studies on long-distance migrants, we evaluate this hypothesis in a population containing both migratory and resident individuals. We use a population of partially migratory blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) in southern Sweden as a model species. Migrants had higher CORT levels at the time of capture than residents, indicating migratory preparations, adaptation to stressors, higher allostatic load or possibly low social status. Migrants and residents had the same stress response, thus contradicting the migration-modulation hypothesis. We suggest that migrants travelling short distances are more benefited than harmed by retaining the ability to respond to stress. (Less)
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author
and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Biology letters
volume
5
pages
480 - 483
publisher
Royal Society Publishing
external identifiers
  • wos:000267881700013
  • pmid:19429650
  • scopus:67849113754
ISSN
1744-9561
DOI
10.1098/rsbl.2009.0193
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Animal Ecology (Closed 2011) (011012001)
id
9e9eb8dd-ba7d-45ae-a439-5616e3167fe9 (old id 1412481)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:26:11
date last changed
2021-08-04 01:34:11
@article{9e9eb8dd-ba7d-45ae-a439-5616e3167fe9,
  abstract     = {The hormone corticosterone (CORT) is an important component of a bird's response to environmental stress, but it can also have negative effects. Therefore, birds on migration are hypothesized to have repressed stress responses (migration-modulation hypothesis). In contrast to earlier studies on long-distance migrants, we evaluate this hypothesis in a population containing both migratory and resident individuals. We use a population of partially migratory blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) in southern Sweden as a model species. Migrants had higher CORT levels at the time of capture than residents, indicating migratory preparations, adaptation to stressors, higher allostatic load or possibly low social status. Migrants and residents had the same stress response, thus contradicting the migration-modulation hypothesis. We suggest that migrants travelling short distances are more benefited than harmed by retaining the ability to respond to stress.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Anna and Sandell, Maria},
  issn         = {1744-9561},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {480--483},
  publisher    = {Royal Society Publishing},
  series       = {Biology letters},
  title        = {Stress hormone dynamics: an adaptation to migration?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2009.0193},
  doi          = {10.1098/rsbl.2009.0193},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {2009},
}