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Assessing the pedestrian response to urban outdoor lighting: A full-scale laboratory study

Rahm, Johan LU and Johansson, Maria LU (2018) In PLoS ONE 13(10).
Abstract
This study identifies and applies methods for evaluating the human response to pedestrian lighting applications intended for future use by the municipality of Malmö, Sweden. The methods employed provide a supplementary perspective to that given by the photometric properties of the lighting applications. The study involved 89 participants from two age groups (Young: N: 43, 19–31 yrs.; Elderly: N: 46, 62–77 yrs.). Data were collected in a full-scale laboratory using a mock-up pedestrian pathway. Three lighting applications (one ceramic metal halide and two LED) were presented and the participants’ behavior (walking speed), perception (ability to perform visual tasks–recognize facial expressions, detect obstacles, read street signpost),... (More)
This study identifies and applies methods for evaluating the human response to pedestrian lighting applications intended for future use by the municipality of Malmö, Sweden. The methods employed provide a supplementary perspective to that given by the photometric properties of the lighting applications. The study involved 89 participants from two age groups (Young: N: 43, 19–31 yrs.; Elderly: N: 46, 62–77 yrs.). Data were collected in a full-scale laboratory using a mock-up pedestrian pathway. Three lighting applications (one ceramic metal halide and two LED) were presented and the participants’ behavior (walking speed), perception (ability to perform visual tasks–recognize facial expressions, detect obstacles, read street signpost), affective response, and evaluation of the lighting quality were assessed.

The three lighting applications significantly differed with regard to the human response. The facial expression recognition distance, sign reading distance and the obstacle detection task, along with the evaluation of lighting quality and level of arousal, distinguished one of the LEDs (Correlated Color Temperature: 3810, Color Rendering Index: 75, Scotopic/Photopic ratio: 1.48) from the other two lighting applications–the participants performed better on the visual tasks, and the lighting was perceived as brighter, more arousing and less pleasant. Methods to capture human perception, evaluation and behavior in relation to outdoor lighting, provide a valuable perspective that should be systematically applied when municipalities consider different pedestrian lighting applications. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Lighting
in
PLoS ONE
volume
13
issue
10
publisher
Public Library of Science
external identifiers
  • scopus:85054453571
ISSN
1932-6203
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0204638
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
141a3e79-0fa2-4f06-85c7-d26ea8995364
date added to LUP
2018-10-04 22:56:23
date last changed
2019-02-20 11:28:53
@article{141a3e79-0fa2-4f06-85c7-d26ea8995364,
  abstract     = {This study identifies and applies methods for evaluating the human response to pedestrian lighting applications intended for future use by the municipality of Malmö, Sweden. The methods employed provide a supplementary perspective to that given by the photometric properties of the lighting applications. The study involved 89 participants from two age groups (Young: N: 43, 19–31 yrs.; Elderly: N: 46, 62–77 yrs.). Data were collected in a full-scale laboratory using a mock-up pedestrian pathway. Three lighting applications (one ceramic metal halide and two LED) were presented and the participants’ behavior (walking speed), perception (ability to perform visual tasks–recognize facial expressions, detect obstacles, read street signpost), affective response, and evaluation of the lighting quality were assessed.<br/><br/>The three lighting applications significantly differed with regard to the human response. The facial expression recognition distance, sign reading distance and the obstacle detection task, along with the evaluation of lighting quality and level of arousal, distinguished one of the LEDs (Correlated Color Temperature: 3810, Color Rendering Index: 75, Scotopic/Photopic ratio: 1.48) from the other two lighting applications–the participants performed better on the visual tasks, and the lighting was perceived as brighter, more arousing and less pleasant. Methods to capture human perception, evaluation and behavior in relation to outdoor lighting, provide a valuable perspective that should be systematically applied when municipalities consider different pedestrian lighting applications.},
  articleno    = {e0204638},
  author       = {Rahm, Johan and Johansson, Maria},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  keyword      = {Lighting},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {10},
  number       = {10},
  publisher    = {Public Library of Science},
  series       = {PLoS ONE},
  title        = {Assessing the pedestrian response to urban outdoor lighting: A full-scale laboratory study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0204638},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2018},
}