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Psychosocial work conditions, social participation and social capital: A causal pathway investigated in a longitudinal study.

Lindström, Martin LU (2006) In Social Science and Medicine 62(2). p.280-291
Abstract
Social capital is often claimed to be promoted by stable social structures such as low migration rates between neighbourhoods and social networks that remain stable over time. However, stable social structures may also inhibit the formation of social capital in the form of social networks and social participation. One example is psychosocial conditions at work, which may be determined by characteristics such as demand and control in the work situation. The study examines the active workforce subpopulation within the Swedish Malmö Shoulder Neck Study. A total of 7836 individuals aged 45–69 years, were interviewed at baseline between 1992 and 1994, and at a 1-year follow-up. Four groups of baseline psychosocial work conditions categories... (More)
Social capital is often claimed to be promoted by stable social structures such as low migration rates between neighbourhoods and social networks that remain stable over time. However, stable social structures may also inhibit the formation of social capital in the form of social networks and social participation. One example is psychosocial conditions at work, which may be determined by characteristics such as demand and control in the work situation. The study examines the active workforce subpopulation within the Swedish Malmö Shoulder Neck Study. A total of 7836 individuals aged 45–69 years, were interviewed at baseline between 1992 and 1994, and at a 1-year follow-up. Four groups of baseline psychosocial work conditions categories defined by the Karasek–Theorell model (jobstrain, passive, active, relaxed) were analysed according to 13 different social participation items during the past year reported at the 1-year follow-up. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals with the jobstrain group as a reference were estimated. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess differences in different aspects of social participation between the four psychosocial work conditions groups. The results show that the respondents within the active category in particular but also the relaxed category, have significantly higher participation in many of the 13 social participation items, even after multivariate adjustments. The results strongly suggest that psychosocial work conditions may be an important determinant of social capital measured as social participation, a finding of immediate public health relevance because of the well known positive association between social participation and health-related behaviours. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Empowerment, Social participation, Social capitals, Sweden, Psychosocial work conditions, Health-related behaviours, Health
in
Social Science and Medicine
volume
62
issue
2
pages
280 - 291
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:16098650
  • wos:000234984100002
  • scopus:28444432263
ISSN
1873-5347
DOI
10.1016/j.socscimed.2005.06.005
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5481e5c1-983a-45c2-8a6b-f697717d2e0f (old id 142796)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:22:37
date last changed
2020-12-08 05:05:33
@article{5481e5c1-983a-45c2-8a6b-f697717d2e0f,
  abstract     = {Social capital is often claimed to be promoted by stable social structures such as low migration rates between neighbourhoods and social networks that remain stable over time. However, stable social structures may also inhibit the formation of social capital in the form of social networks and social participation. One example is psychosocial conditions at work, which may be determined by characteristics such as demand and control in the work situation. The study examines the active workforce subpopulation within the Swedish Malmö Shoulder Neck Study. A total of 7836 individuals aged 45–69 years, were interviewed at baseline between 1992 and 1994, and at a 1-year follow-up. Four groups of baseline psychosocial work conditions categories defined by the Karasek–Theorell model (jobstrain, passive, active, relaxed) were analysed according to 13 different social participation items during the past year reported at the 1-year follow-up. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals with the jobstrain group as a reference were estimated. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess differences in different aspects of social participation between the four psychosocial work conditions groups. The results show that the respondents within the active category in particular but also the relaxed category, have significantly higher participation in many of the 13 social participation items, even after multivariate adjustments. The results strongly suggest that psychosocial work conditions may be an important determinant of social capital measured as social participation, a finding of immediate public health relevance because of the well known positive association between social participation and health-related behaviours.},
  author       = {Lindström, Martin},
  issn         = {1873-5347},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {280--291},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Social Science and Medicine},
  title        = {Psychosocial work conditions, social participation and social capital: A causal pathway investigated in a longitudinal study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2005.06.005},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.socscimed.2005.06.005},
  volume       = {62},
  year         = {2006},
}