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Pregnancy outcomes during treatment with interferon beta-1a in patients with multiple sclerosis.

Sandberg Wollheim, Magnhild LU ; Frank, D; Goodwin, T M; Giesser, B; Lopez-Bresnahan, M; Stam-Moraga, M; Chang, P and Francis, G S (2005) In Neurology 65(6). p.802-806
Abstract
Background: Although patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) are advised to stop interferon (IFN) beta-1a therapy before becoming pregnant, some patients become pregnant while on treatment. Methods: We examined individual patient data from eight clinical trials with IFN beta-1a. Results: Of 3,361 women in the studies, 69 pregnancies were reported, of which 41 were patients receiving (or who had stopped receiving within 2 weeks prior to conception) IFN beta-1a (in utero exposure group), 22 were patients who discontinued IFN beta-1a treatment more than 2 weeks before conception (previous exposure group), and six were patients receiving placebo. The 41 in utero exposure pregnancies resulted in 20 healthy full-term infants, one healthy premature... (More)
Background: Although patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) are advised to stop interferon (IFN) beta-1a therapy before becoming pregnant, some patients become pregnant while on treatment. Methods: We examined individual patient data from eight clinical trials with IFN beta-1a. Results: Of 3,361 women in the studies, 69 pregnancies were reported, of which 41 were patients receiving (or who had stopped receiving within 2 weeks prior to conception) IFN beta-1a (in utero exposure group), 22 were patients who discontinued IFN beta-1a treatment more than 2 weeks before conception (previous exposure group), and six were patients receiving placebo. The 41 in utero exposure pregnancies resulted in 20 healthy full-term infants, one healthy premature infant, nine induced abortions, eight spontaneous abortions, one fetal death, and one congenital anomaly (hydrocephalus). One patient was lost to follow-up. The 22 previous exposure pregnancies resulted in 20 full-term healthy infants, one healthy premature infant, and one birth-related congenital anomaly (Erb palsy) Conclusions: The majority (21/31) of pregnancies that had the potential to go to full term produced healthy infants. The rate of spontaneous abortion was higher, but not significantly so, in the in utero exposure group compared to general population estimates. Until more exposure data become available, patients remain advised to stop IFN beta therapy before becoming pregnant. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Neurology
volume
65
issue
6
pages
802 - 806
publisher
American Academy of Neurology
external identifiers
  • wos:000232109800005
  • pmid:16093457
  • scopus:25444458822
ISSN
1526-632X
DOI
10.1212/01.wnl.0000168905.97207.d0
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
256b9a3e-86d3-4a81-a58c-9c5d08b7a9a4 (old id 142856)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=16093457&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-17 09:18:03
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:41:04
@article{256b9a3e-86d3-4a81-a58c-9c5d08b7a9a4,
  abstract     = {Background: Although patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) are advised to stop interferon (IFN) beta-1a therapy before becoming pregnant, some patients become pregnant while on treatment. Methods: We examined individual patient data from eight clinical trials with IFN beta-1a. Results: Of 3,361 women in the studies, 69 pregnancies were reported, of which 41 were patients receiving (or who had stopped receiving within 2 weeks prior to conception) IFN beta-1a (in utero exposure group), 22 were patients who discontinued IFN beta-1a treatment more than 2 weeks before conception (previous exposure group), and six were patients receiving placebo. The 41 in utero exposure pregnancies resulted in 20 healthy full-term infants, one healthy premature infant, nine induced abortions, eight spontaneous abortions, one fetal death, and one congenital anomaly (hydrocephalus). One patient was lost to follow-up. The 22 previous exposure pregnancies resulted in 20 full-term healthy infants, one healthy premature infant, and one birth-related congenital anomaly (Erb palsy) Conclusions: The majority (21/31) of pregnancies that had the potential to go to full term produced healthy infants. The rate of spontaneous abortion was higher, but not significantly so, in the in utero exposure group compared to general population estimates. Until more exposure data become available, patients remain advised to stop IFN beta therapy before becoming pregnant.},
  author       = {Sandberg Wollheim, Magnhild and Frank, D and Goodwin, T M and Giesser, B and Lopez-Bresnahan, M and Stam-Moraga, M and Chang, P and Francis, G S},
  issn         = {1526-632X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {802--806},
  publisher    = {American Academy of Neurology},
  series       = {Neurology},
  title        = {Pregnancy outcomes during treatment with interferon beta-1a in patients with multiple sclerosis.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/01.wnl.0000168905.97207.d0},
  volume       = {65},
  year         = {2005},
}