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Resistance to tumour challenge after tumour laser thermotherapy is associated with a cellular immune response.

Ivarsson, Kjell LU ; Myllymäki, L; Jansner, Karin LU ; Stenram, Unne LU and Tranberg, Karl-Göran LU (2005) In British Journal of Cancer 93(4). p.435-440
Abstract
Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that interstitial laser thermotherapy (ILT) of an experimental liver tumour is superior to surgical excision, at least partly due to a laser-induced immunological effect. The aim of the present study was to investigate the time-response relationship of the ILT-induced immunisation and the cellular response of macrophages and lymphocytes. A dimethylhydrazine-induced adenocarcinoma was transplanted into the liver of syngeneic rats. Rats with tumour were treated 6-8 days later (tumour size 0.25-0.40 cm(3)) with ILT of tumour or resection of the tumour-bearing lobe. Two groups of rats without tumour were treated with resection of a normal liver lobe or ILT of normal liver. A challenging tumour was... (More)
Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that interstitial laser thermotherapy (ILT) of an experimental liver tumour is superior to surgical excision, at least partly due to a laser-induced immunological effect. The aim of the present study was to investigate the time-response relationship of the ILT-induced immunisation and the cellular response of macrophages and lymphocytes. A dimethylhydrazine-induced adenocarcinoma was transplanted into the liver of syngeneic rats. Rats with tumour were treated 6-8 days later (tumour size 0.25-0.40 cm(3)) with ILT of tumour or resection of the tumour-bearing lobe. Two groups of rats without tumour were treated with resection of a normal liver lobe or ILT of normal liver. A challenging tumour was implanted into the liver of each rat 2, 5 or 10 weeks after primary treatment. Rats were killed 6, 12 and 48 days (or earlier due to their condition) after challenge (n = 8 in all groups). Immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine lymphocytes (CD8, CD4) and macrophages (ED1, ED2) in rats having had treatment of a primary tumour. Interstitial laser thermotherapy of the first tumour was followed by eradication of challenging tumour and absence of tumour spread. This contrasted with rapid growth and spread of challenging tumour in the other groups. In the challenging vital tumour tissue and in the interface between the tumour and surroundings, the number of ED1 macrophages and CD8 lymphocytes was higher in rats having been treated with the ILT of tumour than in those having undergone resection of the tumour-bearing lobe. The number of ED2 macrophages and CD4 lymphocytes was low and did not vary between these two groups. Interstitial laser thermotherapy elicited an immune response that eradicated a challenging tumour and was associated with increased numbers of tumour-infiltrating macrophages and CD8 lymphocytes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
interstitial laser thermotherapy, CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, ED1 and ED2 macrophages, immune response
in
British Journal of Cancer
volume
93
issue
4
pages
435 - 440
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000231260400009
  • pmid:16091763
  • scopus:24944562875
ISSN
1532-1827
DOI
10.1038/sj.bjc.6602718
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
61b8742f-dec0-4300-b618-e14f53286980 (old id 142866)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=16091763&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-13 14:17:36
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:39:05
@article{61b8742f-dec0-4300-b618-e14f53286980,
  abstract     = {Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that interstitial laser thermotherapy (ILT) of an experimental liver tumour is superior to surgical excision, at least partly due to a laser-induced immunological effect. The aim of the present study was to investigate the time-response relationship of the ILT-induced immunisation and the cellular response of macrophages and lymphocytes. A dimethylhydrazine-induced adenocarcinoma was transplanted into the liver of syngeneic rats. Rats with tumour were treated 6-8 days later (tumour size 0.25-0.40 cm(3)) with ILT of tumour or resection of the tumour-bearing lobe. Two groups of rats without tumour were treated with resection of a normal liver lobe or ILT of normal liver. A challenging tumour was implanted into the liver of each rat 2, 5 or 10 weeks after primary treatment. Rats were killed 6, 12 and 48 days (or earlier due to their condition) after challenge (n = 8 in all groups). Immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine lymphocytes (CD8, CD4) and macrophages (ED1, ED2) in rats having had treatment of a primary tumour. Interstitial laser thermotherapy of the first tumour was followed by eradication of challenging tumour and absence of tumour spread. This contrasted with rapid growth and spread of challenging tumour in the other groups. In the challenging vital tumour tissue and in the interface between the tumour and surroundings, the number of ED1 macrophages and CD8 lymphocytes was higher in rats having been treated with the ILT of tumour than in those having undergone resection of the tumour-bearing lobe. The number of ED2 macrophages and CD4 lymphocytes was low and did not vary between these two groups. Interstitial laser thermotherapy elicited an immune response that eradicated a challenging tumour and was associated with increased numbers of tumour-infiltrating macrophages and CD8 lymphocytes.},
  author       = {Ivarsson, Kjell and Myllymäki, L and Jansner, Karin and Stenram, Unne and Tranberg, Karl-Göran},
  issn         = {1532-1827},
  keyword      = {interstitial laser thermotherapy,CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes,ED1 and ED2 macrophages,immune response},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {435--440},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {British Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Resistance to tumour challenge after tumour laser thermotherapy is associated with a cellular immune response.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6602718},
  volume       = {93},
  year         = {2005},
}