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Social capital, the miniaturization of community and high alcohol consumption: a population-based study

Lindström, Martin LU (2005) In Alcohol and Alcoholism 40(6). p.556-562
Abstract
Aims: To study the impact of social participation, trust, and the miniaturization of community, i.e. high social participation/low trust, on the risk of high alcohol consumption. Methods: The Scania 2000 public health survey is a cross-sectional, postal questionnaire study. A total of 13 604 persons aged 18–80 years were included. A logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between the social capital variables and high alcohol consumption (168.0 g/week or more for men and 108.0 g/week or more for women). The multivariate analyses analysed the importance of confounders (age, country of origin, education, and economic stress) on the risk of high alcohol consumption according to the social capital variables. Results: A... (More)
Aims: To study the impact of social participation, trust, and the miniaturization of community, i.e. high social participation/low trust, on the risk of high alcohol consumption. Methods: The Scania 2000 public health survey is a cross-sectional, postal questionnaire study. A total of 13 604 persons aged 18–80 years were included. A logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between the social capital variables and high alcohol consumption (168.0 g/week or more for men and 108.0 g/week or more for women). The multivariate analyses analysed the importance of confounders (age, country of origin, education, and economic stress) on the risk of high alcohol consumption according to the social capital variables. Results: A 14.0% proportion of all men and 7.8% of all women had an alcohol consumption above recommended levels. High alcohol consumption above recommended levels was not associated with social participation but negatively associated with trust among men. The miniaturization of community category, i.e. high social participation/low trust, had significantly higher risks of high alcohol consumption compared to the high social capital (high social participation/high trust) category among men. Conclusion: High social participation combined with low trust, i.e. the miniaturization of community, is positively associated high alcohol consumption among men. A structural/social factor which may affect the amount of alcohol consumed has thus been identified in this study. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Alcohol and Alcoholism
volume
40
issue
6
pages
556 - 562
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000232596500015
  • scopus:27744574417
ISSN
1464-3502
DOI
10.1093/alcalc/agh190
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
474a599f-d427-49e8-b09e-cc0ec42bafec (old id 142901)
date added to LUP
2007-07-24 14:52:44
date last changed
2017-02-19 03:37:13
@article{474a599f-d427-49e8-b09e-cc0ec42bafec,
  abstract     = {Aims: To study the impact of social participation, trust, and the miniaturization of community, i.e. high social participation/low trust, on the risk of high alcohol consumption. Methods: The Scania 2000 public health survey is a cross-sectional, postal questionnaire study. A total of 13 604 persons aged 18–80 years were included. A logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between the social capital variables and high alcohol consumption (168.0 g/week or more for men and 108.0 g/week or more for women). The multivariate analyses analysed the importance of confounders (age, country of origin, education, and economic stress) on the risk of high alcohol consumption according to the social capital variables. Results: A 14.0% proportion of all men and 7.8% of all women had an alcohol consumption above recommended levels. High alcohol consumption above recommended levels was not associated with social participation but negatively associated with trust among men. The miniaturization of community category, i.e. high social participation/low trust, had significantly higher risks of high alcohol consumption compared to the high social capital (high social participation/high trust) category among men. Conclusion: High social participation combined with low trust, i.e. the miniaturization of community, is positively associated high alcohol consumption among men. A structural/social factor which may affect the amount of alcohol consumed has thus been identified in this study.},
  author       = {Lindström, Martin},
  issn         = {1464-3502},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {556--562},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Alcohol and Alcoholism},
  title        = {Social capital, the miniaturization of community and high alcohol consumption: a population-based study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/alcalc/agh190},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2005},
}