Advanced

Who are the "quitters"? a cross-sectional study of circumstances associated with women giving up smoking.

Janzon, Ellis LU ; Engström, Gunnar LU ; Lindström, Martin LU ; Berglund, Göran LU ; Hedblad, Bo LU and Janzon, Lars LU (2005) In Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 33(3). p.175-182
Abstract
Background: Smoking is an important preventable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, cancer, and many other diseases.

Even though tobacco consumption is declining in Sweden, it is not declining in all groups. This study explored

socioeconomic and psychosocial circumstances hindering or facilitating smoking cessation in three birth cohorts of women

from the general population. Methods: Between 1991 and 1996 a comprehensive questionnaire was administered to 17,319

women, 45–73 years old, from the Malmo¨ Diet and Cancer cohort. Smoking habits were compared in relation to

socioeconomic and psychosocial circumstances in three birth cohorts. Results: Of these women, 44% were never ... (More)
Background: Smoking is an important preventable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, cancer, and many other diseases.

Even though tobacco consumption is declining in Sweden, it is not declining in all groups. This study explored

socioeconomic and psychosocial circumstances hindering or facilitating smoking cessation in three birth cohorts of women

from the general population. Methods: Between 1991 and 1996 a comprehensive questionnaire was administered to 17,319

women, 45–73 years old, from the Malmo¨ Diet and Cancer cohort. Smoking habits were compared in relation to

socioeconomic and psychosocial circumstances in three birth cohorts. Results: Of these women, 44% were never smokers,

28% were ex-smokers, and 28% were smokers (regular or occasional). When compared with smokers, ex-smokers were

more often married, had a higher socioeconomic position, a longer education, more smoke-free surroundings, better

emotional support, higher BMI, and better self-perceived health. Ex-smokers reported less work-related stress and less shift

work. A history of cardiovascular disease was not associated with smoking cessation. The socioeconomic differences

between current and former smokers were higher for young women as compared with older birth cohorts. Conclusions:

Continuing smokers and quitters differ with regard to socioeconomic and psychosocial circumstances and factors related to

working life and environmental tobacco exposure. By determining who the quitters are through continued follow-up, useful

insights can be gained to develop strategies to achieve successful cessation of smoking. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Life Style, Middle Aged, Questionnaires, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Aged, Cohort Studies, Comparative Study, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Smoking: psychology, Smoking Cessation: psychology, Social Support, Socioeconomic Factors, Sweden
in
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
volume
33
issue
3
pages
175 - 182
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000229546800005
  • pmid:16040457
  • scopus:20944452319
ISSN
1651-1905
DOI
10.1080/14034940410019244
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8581b0e0-ce47-4298-8331-36f1a6025082 (old id 143163)
date added to LUP
2007-07-25 09:44:37
date last changed
2017-06-11 04:26:05
@article{8581b0e0-ce47-4298-8331-36f1a6025082,
  abstract     = {Background: Smoking is an important preventable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, cancer, and many other diseases.<br/><br>
Even though tobacco consumption is declining in Sweden, it is not declining in all groups. This study explored<br/><br>
socioeconomic and psychosocial circumstances hindering or facilitating smoking cessation in three birth cohorts of women<br/><br>
from the general population. Methods: Between 1991 and 1996 a comprehensive questionnaire was administered to 17,319<br/><br>
women, 45–73 years old, from the Malmo¨ Diet and Cancer cohort. Smoking habits were compared in relation to<br/><br>
socioeconomic and psychosocial circumstances in three birth cohorts. Results: Of these women, 44% were never smokers,<br/><br>
28% were ex-smokers, and 28% were smokers (regular or occasional). When compared with smokers, ex-smokers were<br/><br>
more often married, had a higher socioeconomic position, a longer education, more smoke-free surroundings, better<br/><br>
emotional support, higher BMI, and better self-perceived health. Ex-smokers reported less work-related stress and less shift<br/><br>
work. A history of cardiovascular disease was not associated with smoking cessation. The socioeconomic differences<br/><br>
between current and former smokers were higher for young women as compared with older birth cohorts. Conclusions:<br/><br>
Continuing smokers and quitters differ with regard to socioeconomic and psychosocial circumstances and factors related to<br/><br>
working life and environmental tobacco exposure. By determining who the quitters are through continued follow-up, useful<br/><br>
insights can be gained to develop strategies to achieve successful cessation of smoking.},
  author       = {Janzon, Ellis and Engström, Gunnar and Lindström, Martin and Berglund, Göran and Hedblad, Bo and Janzon, Lars},
  issn         = {1651-1905},
  keyword      = {Life Style,Middle Aged,Questionnaires,Research Support,Non-U.S. Gov't,Aged,Cohort Studies,Comparative Study,Cross-Sectional Studies,Female,Follow-Up Studies,Humans,Smoking: psychology,Smoking Cessation: psychology,Social Support,Socioeconomic Factors,Sweden},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {175--182},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Who are the "quitters"? a cross-sectional study of circumstances associated with women giving up smoking.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14034940410019244},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2005},
}