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Lipopolysaccharide induces cell death in cultured porcine myenteric neurons.

Arciszewski, Marcin; Pierzynowski, Stefan LU and Ekblad, Eva LU (2005) In Digestive Diseases and Sciences 50(9). p.1661-1668
Abstract
Enteric bacteria execute, via lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a pathogenic role in intestinal inflammation. The effects of LPS on survival and neurotransmitter expression in cultured porcine myenteric neurons were investigated. Myenteric neurons were isolated and cultured for 6 days in medium, in LPS (100 ng/ml) with or without α-ketoglutarate or the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME, in α-ketoglutarate or in the NO donor SNAP. Neuronal survival and expression of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and NOS were evaluated by immunocytochemistry. Addition of LPS significantly decreased neuronal survival; only 40% survived, compared to controls run in parallel. The LPS-induced neurotoxic effect was not counteracted by the simultaneous... (More)
Enteric bacteria execute, via lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a pathogenic role in intestinal inflammation. The effects of LPS on survival and neurotransmitter expression in cultured porcine myenteric neurons were investigated. Myenteric neurons were isolated and cultured for 6 days in medium, in LPS (100 ng/ml) with or without α-ketoglutarate or the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME, in α-ketoglutarate or in the NO donor SNAP. Neuronal survival and expression of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and NOS were evaluated by immunocytochemistry. Addition of LPS significantly decreased neuronal survival; only 40% survived, compared to controls run in parallel. The LPS-induced neurotoxic effect was not counteracted by the simultaneous presence of α-ketoglutarate or L-NAME. Either SNAP or α-ketoglutarate influenced neuronal survival. Culturing, particularly in the presence of LPS, markedly increased the proportion of VIP-immunoreactive neurons; NOS-immunoreactive neurons were unchanged. The reported LPS-induced neurotoxicity indicates loss of enteric neurons as a consequence of intestinal inflammation. (Less)
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keywords
Myenteric Plexus: cytology, Animals, Cell Culture Techniques, Cell Death, Cell Survival, Female, Immunohistochemistry, Inflammation, Intestinal Diseases: etiology, Intestinal Diseases: immunology, Intestinal Diseases: microbiology, Lipopolysaccharides: pharmacology, Male, Myenteric Plexus: pathology, Neurons: drug effects, Neurons: physiology, Neurotransmitters: biosynthesis, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Swine
in
Digestive Diseases and Sciences
volume
50
issue
9
pages
1661 - 1668
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000231312700015
  • pmid:16133966
  • scopus:23944452404
ISSN
1573-2568
DOI
10.1007/s10620-005-2912-2
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fa83cbee-9c50-43a1-92d6-e36db1bada1d (old id 143918)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=16133966&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-10 09:46:50
date last changed
2017-04-16 03:31:39
@article{fa83cbee-9c50-43a1-92d6-e36db1bada1d,
  abstract     = {Enteric bacteria execute, via lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a pathogenic role in intestinal inflammation. The effects of LPS on survival and neurotransmitter expression in cultured porcine myenteric neurons were investigated. Myenteric neurons were isolated and cultured for 6 days in medium, in LPS (100 ng/ml) with or without α-ketoglutarate or the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME, in α-ketoglutarate or in the NO donor SNAP. Neuronal survival and expression of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and NOS were evaluated by immunocytochemistry. Addition of LPS significantly decreased neuronal survival; only 40% survived, compared to controls run in parallel. The LPS-induced neurotoxic effect was not counteracted by the simultaneous presence of α-ketoglutarate or L-NAME. Either SNAP or α-ketoglutarate influenced neuronal survival. Culturing, particularly in the presence of LPS, markedly increased the proportion of VIP-immunoreactive neurons; NOS-immunoreactive neurons were unchanged. The reported LPS-induced neurotoxicity indicates loss of enteric neurons as a consequence of intestinal inflammation.},
  author       = {Arciszewski, Marcin and Pierzynowski, Stefan and Ekblad, Eva},
  issn         = {1573-2568},
  keyword      = {Myenteric Plexus: cytology,Animals,Cell Culture Techniques,Cell Death,Cell Survival,Female,Immunohistochemistry,Inflammation,Intestinal Diseases: etiology,Intestinal Diseases: immunology,Intestinal Diseases: microbiology,Lipopolysaccharides: pharmacology,Male,Myenteric Plexus: pathology,Neurons: drug effects,Neurons: physiology,Neurotransmitters: biosynthesis,Research Support,Non-U.S. Gov't,Swine},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1661--1668},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Digestive Diseases and Sciences},
  title        = {Lipopolysaccharide induces cell death in cultured porcine myenteric neurons.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10620-005-2912-2},
  volume       = {50},
  year         = {2005},
}