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Optimum spatiotemporal receptive fields for vision in dim light

Klaus, Andreas and Warrant, Eric LU (2009) In Journal of Vision 9(4).
Abstract
Many nocturnal insects depend on vision for daily life and have evolved different strategies to improve their visual capabilities in dim light. Neural summation of visual signals is one strategy to improve visual performance, and this is likely to be especially important for insects with apposition compound eyes. Here we develop a model to determine the optimum spatiotemporal sampling of natural scenes at gradually decreasing light levels. Image anisotropy has a strong influence on the receptive field properties predicted to be optimal at low light intensities. Spatial summation between visual channels is predicted to extend more strongly in the direction with higher correlations between the input signals. Increased spatiotemporal... (More)
Many nocturnal insects depend on vision for daily life and have evolved different strategies to improve their visual capabilities in dim light. Neural summation of visual signals is one strategy to improve visual performance, and this is likely to be especially important for insects with apposition compound eyes. Here we develop a model to determine the optimum spatiotemporal sampling of natural scenes at gradually decreasing light levels. Image anisotropy has a strong influence on the receptive field properties predicted to be optimal at low light intensities. Spatial summation between visual channels is predicted to extend more strongly in the direction with higher correlations between the input signals. Increased spatiotemporal summation increases signal-to-noise ratio at low frequencies but sacrifices signal-to-noise ratio at higher frequencies. These results, while obtained from a model of the insect visual system, are likely to apply to visual systems in general. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
apposition compound eye, neural summation, receptive field, anisotropy, optimization, signal-to-noise ratio
in
Journal of Vision
volume
9
issue
4
publisher
Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology
external identifiers
  • wos:000267288000019
  • scopus:65349111875
ISSN
1534-7362
DOI
10.1167/9.4.18
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
131a16e6-d418-47df-b177-10cae79aeebf (old id 1441263)
date added to LUP
2009-07-28 10:53:25
date last changed
2017-10-01 04:07:52
@article{131a16e6-d418-47df-b177-10cae79aeebf,
  abstract     = {Many nocturnal insects depend on vision for daily life and have evolved different strategies to improve their visual capabilities in dim light. Neural summation of visual signals is one strategy to improve visual performance, and this is likely to be especially important for insects with apposition compound eyes. Here we develop a model to determine the optimum spatiotemporal sampling of natural scenes at gradually decreasing light levels. Image anisotropy has a strong influence on the receptive field properties predicted to be optimal at low light intensities. Spatial summation between visual channels is predicted to extend more strongly in the direction with higher correlations between the input signals. Increased spatiotemporal summation increases signal-to-noise ratio at low frequencies but sacrifices signal-to-noise ratio at higher frequencies. These results, while obtained from a model of the insect visual system, are likely to apply to visual systems in general.},
  author       = {Klaus, Andreas and Warrant, Eric},
  issn         = {1534-7362},
  keyword      = {apposition compound eye,neural summation,receptive field,anisotropy,optimization,signal-to-noise ratio},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  publisher    = {Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology},
  series       = {Journal of Vision},
  title        = {Optimum spatiotemporal receptive fields for vision in dim light},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1167/9.4.18},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2009},
}