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Reproductive investment of a lacertid lizard in fragmented habitat

Diaz, JA; Perez-Tris, Javier LU ; Telleria, JL; Carbonell, R and Santos, T (2005) In Conservation Biology 19(5). p.1578-1585
Abstract
We studied the effect of habitat fragmentation on female reproductive investment in a widespread lacertid lizard (Psammodromus algirus) in a mixed-forest archipelago of deciduous and evergreen oak woods in northern Spain. We captured gravid females in fragments (<= 10 ha) and forests (>= 200 ha) and brought them to the laboratory, where they laid their eggs. We incubated the eggs and released the first cohort of juveniles into the wild to monitor their survival. Females from fragments produced a smaller clutch mass and laid fewer eggs (relative to mean egg mass) than females of similar body size from forests. Lizards did not trade larger clutches for larger offspring, however, because females from fragments did not lay larger eggs... (More)
We studied the effect of habitat fragmentation on female reproductive investment in a widespread lacertid lizard (Psammodromus algirus) in a mixed-forest archipelago of deciduous and evergreen oak woods in northern Spain. We captured gravid females in fragments (<= 10 ha) and forests (>= 200 ha) and brought them to the laboratory, where they laid their eggs. We incubated the eggs and released the first cohort of juveniles into the wild to monitor their survival. Females from fragments produced a smaller clutch mass and laid fewer eggs (relative to mean egg mass) than females of similar body size from forests. Lizards did not trade larger clutches for larger offspring, however, because females from fragments did not lay larger eggs (relative to their number) than females from forests. Among the first cohort of juveniles, larger egg mass and body size increased the probability of recapture the next year Thus, fragmentation decreased the relative fecundity of lizards without increasing the quality of their offspring. Reduced energy availability, increased predation risk, and demographic stochasticity could decrease the fitness of lizards in fragmented habitats, which could contribute to the regional scarcity of this species in agricultural areas sprinkled with small patches of otherwise suitable forest. Our results show that predictable reduction of reproductive output with decreasing size of habitat patches can be added to the already known processes that cause inverse density dependence at low population numbers. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Conservation Biology
volume
19
issue
5
pages
1578 - 1585
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000232137900027
  • scopus:28344453767
ISSN
0888-8892
DOI
10.1111/j.1523-1739.2005.00197.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2385760d-28d0-4849-9687-9d48e78cfeee (old id 145195)
date added to LUP
2007-06-25 14:20:16
date last changed
2017-09-10 04:35:55
@article{2385760d-28d0-4849-9687-9d48e78cfeee,
  abstract     = {We studied the effect of habitat fragmentation on female reproductive investment in a widespread lacertid lizard (Psammodromus algirus) in a mixed-forest archipelago of deciduous and evergreen oak woods in northern Spain. We captured gravid females in fragments (&lt;= 10 ha) and forests (&gt;= 200 ha) and brought them to the laboratory, where they laid their eggs. We incubated the eggs and released the first cohort of juveniles into the wild to monitor their survival. Females from fragments produced a smaller clutch mass and laid fewer eggs (relative to mean egg mass) than females of similar body size from forests. Lizards did not trade larger clutches for larger offspring, however, because females from fragments did not lay larger eggs (relative to their number) than females from forests. Among the first cohort of juveniles, larger egg mass and body size increased the probability of recapture the next year Thus, fragmentation decreased the relative fecundity of lizards without increasing the quality of their offspring. Reduced energy availability, increased predation risk, and demographic stochasticity could decrease the fitness of lizards in fragmented habitats, which could contribute to the regional scarcity of this species in agricultural areas sprinkled with small patches of otherwise suitable forest. Our results show that predictable reduction of reproductive output with decreasing size of habitat patches can be added to the already known processes that cause inverse density dependence at low population numbers.},
  author       = {Diaz, JA and Perez-Tris, Javier and Telleria, JL and Carbonell, R and Santos, T},
  issn         = {0888-8892},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1578--1585},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Conservation Biology},
  title        = {Reproductive investment of a lacertid lizard in fragmented habitat},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1523-1739.2005.00197.x},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2005},
}