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The evolution of repeated mating under sexual conflict

Härdling, Roger LU and Kaitala, A (2005) In Journal of Evolutionary Biology 18(1). p.106-115
Abstract
In insects, repeated mating by females may have direct effects on female fecundity, fertility, and longevity. In addition, a female's remating rate affects her fitness through mortality costs of male harassment and ecological risks of mating such as predation. We analyse a model where these female fitness factors are put into their life-history context, and traded against each other, while accounting for limitations because of mate availability. We solve analytically for the condition when female multiple mating will evolve. We show that the probability that a female mates with a courting male decreases with increases in population density. The extent of conflict between the sexes thus automatically becomes larger at higher densities.... (More)
In insects, repeated mating by females may have direct effects on female fecundity, fertility, and longevity. In addition, a female's remating rate affects her fitness through mortality costs of male harassment and ecological risks of mating such as predation. We analyse a model where these female fitness factors are put into their life-history context, and traded against each other, while accounting for limitations because of mate availability. We solve analytically for the condition when female multiple mating will evolve. We show that the probability that a female mates with a courting male decreases with increases in population density. The extent of conflict between the sexes thus automatically becomes larger at higher densities. However, because at higher densities females meet males at a higher rate, the resulting ESS female remating rate is independent of population density. The female remating probability is in conflict with male adaptations that increase male mating rate by persuading or forcing females to mate, and also in conflict with male adaptations for protecting the own sperm from being removed by future female mates. We show that the relative importance of these conflicts depends on population density. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Evolutionary Biology
volume
18
issue
1
pages
106 - 115
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000226400000011
  • scopus:12744273227
ISSN
1420-9101
DOI
10.1111/j.1420-9101.2004.00795.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ed443756-9c33-4a83-9f5c-1d8f82545460 (old id 145268)
date added to LUP
2007-06-25 14:36:55
date last changed
2017-09-17 05:03:22
@article{ed443756-9c33-4a83-9f5c-1d8f82545460,
  abstract     = {In insects, repeated mating by females may have direct effects on female fecundity, fertility, and longevity. In addition, a female's remating rate affects her fitness through mortality costs of male harassment and ecological risks of mating such as predation. We analyse a model where these female fitness factors are put into their life-history context, and traded against each other, while accounting for limitations because of mate availability. We solve analytically for the condition when female multiple mating will evolve. We show that the probability that a female mates with a courting male decreases with increases in population density. The extent of conflict between the sexes thus automatically becomes larger at higher densities. However, because at higher densities females meet males at a higher rate, the resulting ESS female remating rate is independent of population density. The female remating probability is in conflict with male adaptations that increase male mating rate by persuading or forcing females to mate, and also in conflict with male adaptations for protecting the own sperm from being removed by future female mates. We show that the relative importance of these conflicts depends on population density.},
  author       = {Härdling, Roger and Kaitala, A},
  issn         = {1420-9101},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {106--115},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  title        = {The evolution of repeated mating under sexual conflict},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1420-9101.2004.00795.x},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2005},
}