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Barriers and distances as determinants for the evolution of bird migration links: the arctic shorebird system

Henningsson, Sara LU and Alerstam, Thomas LU (2005) In Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences 272(1578). p.2251-2258
Abstract
We analysed migratory connectivity between different winter quarters and breeding sectors in the circumpolar tundra region for arctic shorebirds, in relation to migratory distances and ecological barriers. Total distances and barriers were calculated and measured for all potential migratory orthodrome links between 10 selected winter regions and 12 breeding sectors. The migratory segment between the northernmost stopover site and the breeding area, associated with the entry to and exit from the tundra during spring and autumn migration, respectively, was also identified and measured for each potential link. The analysis indicated that the evolution of migratory links among arctic shorebirds is constrained not by distance as such but by... (More)
We analysed migratory connectivity between different winter quarters and breeding sectors in the circumpolar tundra region for arctic shorebirds, in relation to migratory distances and ecological barriers. Total distances and barriers were calculated and measured for all potential migratory orthodrome links between 10 selected winter regions and 12 breeding sectors. The migratory segment between the northernmost stopover site and the breeding area, associated with the entry to and exit from the tundra during spring and autumn migration, respectively, was also identified and measured for each potential link. The analysis indicated that the evolution of migratory links among arctic shorebirds is constrained not by distance as such but by distance across ecological barriers, possibly because of the complex adaptations required for barrier crossing and extensive detour migration (and in a few cases because barrier distances exceed the birds' theoretical flight range capacity). A particularly pronounced barrier effect of the Arctic Ocean, as apparent from a sharp decline in migratory connectivity between the opposite sides of the Arctic Ocean, may reflect a crucial importance of favourable entry and exit conditions for successfully occupying different sectors of the tundra breeding area by shorebirds from winter regions situated at widely different total distances in both the southern and northern hemispheres. (Less)
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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences
volume
272
issue
1578
pages
2251 - 2258
publisher
Royal Society
external identifiers
  • wos:000232719200004
  • pmid:16191637
  • scopus:27244451049
ISSN
1471-2954
DOI
10.1098/rspb.2005.3221
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ef6c02f0-fb53-4e64-a3d8-fd323791a7b7 (old id 145293)
date added to LUP
2007-06-25 14:35:25
date last changed
2017-06-11 03:34:52
@article{ef6c02f0-fb53-4e64-a3d8-fd323791a7b7,
  abstract     = {We analysed migratory connectivity between different winter quarters and breeding sectors in the circumpolar tundra region for arctic shorebirds, in relation to migratory distances and ecological barriers. Total distances and barriers were calculated and measured for all potential migratory orthodrome links between 10 selected winter regions and 12 breeding sectors. The migratory segment between the northernmost stopover site and the breeding area, associated with the entry to and exit from the tundra during spring and autumn migration, respectively, was also identified and measured for each potential link. The analysis indicated that the evolution of migratory links among arctic shorebirds is constrained not by distance as such but by distance across ecological barriers, possibly because of the complex adaptations required for barrier crossing and extensive detour migration (and in a few cases because barrier distances exceed the birds' theoretical flight range capacity). A particularly pronounced barrier effect of the Arctic Ocean, as apparent from a sharp decline in migratory connectivity between the opposite sides of the Arctic Ocean, may reflect a crucial importance of favourable entry and exit conditions for successfully occupying different sectors of the tundra breeding area by shorebirds from winter regions situated at widely different total distances in both the southern and northern hemispheres.},
  author       = {Henningsson, Sara and Alerstam, Thomas},
  issn         = {1471-2954},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1578},
  pages        = {2251--2258},
  publisher    = {Royal Society},
  series       = {Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences},
  title        = {Barriers and distances as determinants for the evolution of bird migration links: the arctic shorebird system},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2005.3221},
  volume       = {272},
  year         = {2005},
}