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Is there a "migratory syndrome" common to all migrant birds?

Piersma, T; Perez-Tris, Javier LU ; Mouritsen, H; Bauchinger, U and Bairlein, F (2005) In Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1046. p.282-293
Abstract
Bird migration has been assumed, mostly implicitly, to represent a distinct class of animal behavior, with deep and strong homologies in the various phenotypic expressions of migratory behavior between different taxa. Here the evidence for the existence of what could be called a "migratory syndrome," a tightly integrated, old group of adaptive traits that enables birds to commit themselves to highly organized seasonal migrations, is assessed. A list of problems faced by migratory birds is listed first and the traits that migratory birds have evolved to deal with these problems are discussed. The usefulness of comparative approaches to investigate which traits are unique to migrants is then discussed. A provisional conclusion that, perhaps... (More)
Bird migration has been assumed, mostly implicitly, to represent a distinct class of animal behavior, with deep and strong homologies in the various phenotypic expressions of migratory behavior between different taxa. Here the evidence for the existence of what could be called a "migratory syndrome," a tightly integrated, old group of adaptive traits that enables birds to commit themselves to highly organized seasonal migrations, is assessed. A list of problems faced by migratory birds is listed first and the traits that migratory birds have evolved to deal with these problems are discussed. The usefulness of comparative approaches to investigate which traits are unique to migrants is then discussed. A provisional conclusion that, perhaps apart from a capacity for night-time compass orientation, there is little evidence for deeply rooted co-adapted trait complexes that could make up such a migratory syndrome, is suggested. Detailed analyses of the genetic and physiological architecture of potential adaptations to migration, combined with a comparative approach to further identify the phylogenetic levels at which different adaptive traits for migration have evolved, are recommended. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
volume
1046
pages
282 - 293
publisher
New York Academy of Sciences
external identifiers
  • pmid:16055861
  • wos:000231874300023
  • scopus:23744442394
ISSN
0077-8923
DOI
10.1196/annals.1343.026
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2550526e-4ac6-476d-865e-e0053c18da45 (old id 145386)
date added to LUP
2007-06-25 15:36:48
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:33:59
@article{2550526e-4ac6-476d-865e-e0053c18da45,
  abstract     = {Bird migration has been assumed, mostly implicitly, to represent a distinct class of animal behavior, with deep and strong homologies in the various phenotypic expressions of migratory behavior between different taxa. Here the evidence for the existence of what could be called a "migratory syndrome," a tightly integrated, old group of adaptive traits that enables birds to commit themselves to highly organized seasonal migrations, is assessed. A list of problems faced by migratory birds is listed first and the traits that migratory birds have evolved to deal with these problems are discussed. The usefulness of comparative approaches to investigate which traits are unique to migrants is then discussed. A provisional conclusion that, perhaps apart from a capacity for night-time compass orientation, there is little evidence for deeply rooted co-adapted trait complexes that could make up such a migratory syndrome, is suggested. Detailed analyses of the genetic and physiological architecture of potential adaptations to migration, combined with a comparative approach to further identify the phylogenetic levels at which different adaptive traits for migration have evolved, are recommended.},
  author       = {Piersma, T and Perez-Tris, Javier and Mouritsen, H and Bauchinger, U and Bairlein, F},
  issn         = {0077-8923},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {282--293},
  publisher    = {New York Academy of Sciences},
  series       = {Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  title        = {Is there a "migratory syndrome" common to all migrant birds?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1196/annals.1343.026},
  volume       = {1046},
  year         = {2005},
}